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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, so most of my trips indicate via the "last 3 trips taken" window that I've been getting between 40-45 mpg in city driving.

On the other hand, the guage that tracks the average mpg I've achieved has held steady at about 35, which is consistent with the remaining fuel miles guage vs the number of miles I've done during the tank.

What might explain this inconsistency, and further, why the heck might I only be getting 35 mpg when I'm using many of the hypermiling techniques I've read about?

I anticipate traffic and get off the accelerator way before getting to a light turning red, I'll use neutral as well to mitigate friction while coasting. I'll use cruise control when practical, I accelerate smoothly, I pulse and glide and go slow up hills when not holding up traffic, and I'll either go downhill in neutral if coming to a stop soon or accelerate downhill then put it in neutral and glide if I'll have a long run after coming off the hill.

Is it just that the car isn't yet broken in or am I doing it wrong? Getting only the listed 35 mpg while utilizing all these techniques should give me better, and again, the one guage indicates *seemingly falsely" that I am doing much better.

I don't know if it's related but is anyone else noticing that the guage that tracks if you brake or accelerate too hard sometimes indicates very slight braking even when just coasting along in neutral? Perhaps I'm getting some drag from somewhere? The emergency brake isn't on or anything, and it registers only slightly.
 

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Ok, so most of my trips indicate via the "last 3 trips taken" window that I've been getting between 40-45 mpg in city driving.

On the other hand, the guage that tracks the average mpg I've achieved has held steady at about 35, which is consistent with the remaining fuel miles guage vs the number of miles I've done during the tank.

What might explain this inconsistency, and further, why the heck might I only be getting 35 mpg when I'm using many of the hypermiling techniques I've read about?

I anticipate traffic and get off the accelerator way before getting to a light turning red, I'll use neutral as well to mitigate friction while coasting. I'll use cruise control when practical, I accelerate smoothly, I pulse and glide and go slow up hills when not holding up traffic, and I'll either go downhill in neutral if coming to a stop soon or accelerate downhill then put it in neutral and glide if I'll have a long run after coming off the hill.

Is it just that the car isn't yet broken in or am I doing it wrong? Getting only the listed 35 mpg while utilizing all these techniques should give me better, and again, the one guage indicates *seemingly falsely" that I am doing much better.

I don't know if it's related but is anyone else noticing that the guage that tracks if you brake or accelerate too hard sometimes indicates very slight braking even when just coasting along in neutral? Perhaps I'm getting some drag from somewhere? The emergency brake isn't on or anything, and it registers only slightly.
I do a lot of city driving, mostly short trips of 1 - 2 miles as work, home, and regular shopping are all close by. My lifetime average so far in 700 miles is 35 mpg, including about half highway miles, where I can get over 40.

Sometimes I can get high 30s and low 40s in the city, but if the lights and / or traffic are against me, it can be the lows 20s as shown via the trip-mileage bar.

One thing I've noticed driving about 700 miles now over 3 weeks, is that it takes longer for the mpg to change up than for it to change down. This is because 40-42 mpg's from highway driving isn't that much over my average of 35 mpgs, whereas low- to mid-20s is a fairly large amount below my average.

So, for instance, I started a 100 mile weekend highway (42 mpg's) trip at 34.7 and wound up at 35.2, and increase of 0.1 mpg's for every 20 miles. Then, I started the workweek at 35.2 and with about 15 miles of city driving in 7 or 8 very short trips, the mpg went down to 35.0, a drop of 0.2 in only 15 miles.

(Gradually, I'm getting better at city mpg's and am expecting better numbers out of this third tank that started this evening.)
 

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I do a lot of city driving, mostly short trips of 1 - 2 miles as work, home, and regular shopping are all close by. My lifetime average so far in 700 miles is 35 mpg, including about half highway miles, where I can get over 40.

Sometimes I can get high 30s and low 40s in the city, but if the lights and / or traffic are against me, it can be the lows 20s as shown via the trip-mileage bar.

One thing I've noticed driving about 700 miles now over 3 weeks, is that it takes longer for the mpg to change up than for it to change down. This is because 40-42 mpg's from highway driving isn't that much over my average of 35 mpgs, whereas low- to mid-20s is a fairly large amount below my average.

So, for instance, I started a 100 mile weekend highway (42 mpg's) trip at 34.7 and wound up at 35.2, and increase of 0.1 mpg's for every 20 miles. Then, I started the workweek at 35.2 and with about 15 miles of city driving in 7 or 8 very short trips, the mpg went down to 35.0, a drop of 0.2 in only 15 miles.

(Gradually, I'm getting better at city mpg's and am expecting better numbers out of this third tank that started this evening.)
:yeahthat:
 

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:yeahthat:

Well atleast now I know that my mpg is right there with others. Im just not that good at all this mpg/eco green stuff. I cant even get past the 1st level in the eco score at the end of trips. :pP: I keep killing all the flowers lol

I have to keep my foot out of it more

:woowoo:
 

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Ok, so most of my trips indicate via the "last 3 trips taken" window that I've been getting between 40-45 mpg in city driving.

On the other hand, the guage that tracks the average mpg I've achieved has held steady at about 35, which is consistent with the remaining fuel miles guage vs the number of miles I've done during the tank.

What might explain this inconsistency, and further, why the heck might I only be getting 35 mpg when I'm using many of the hypermiling techniques I've read about?

I anticipate traffic and get off the accelerator way before getting to a light turning red, I'll use neutral as well to mitigate friction while coasting. I'll use cruise control when practical, I accelerate smoothly, I pulse and glide and go slow up hills when not holding up traffic, and I'll either go downhill in neutral if coming to a stop soon or accelerate downhill then put it in neutral and glide if I'll have a long run after coming off the hill.

Is it just that the car isn't yet broken in or am I doing it wrong? Getting only the listed 35 mpg while utilizing all these techniques should give me better, and again, the one guage indicates *seemingly falsely" that I am doing much better.

I don't know if it's related but is anyone else noticing that the guage that tracks if you brake or accelerate too hard sometimes indicates very slight braking even when just coasting along in neutral? Perhaps I'm getting some drag from somewhere? The emergency brake isn't on or anything, and it registers only slightly.
I am assuming you have a manual and also I do not own a CR-Z so some may not apply.

Coasting in neutral will turn the injectors on and the car will idle (i dont think the crz turns off coasting in neutral). Anyway it is usally better to coast in gear (no fuel used although you slow down slightly from compression braking) than to coast in neutral using fuel.

Many argue you can get better gas mileage WITHOUT cruise control.

Going slow up hills may hurt you. The whole less fuel for longer (slow up a hill) or more fuel for shorter (fast up a hill). Depending on how much you bog the engine and just how slow you are going it may make more sene to carry your momentum and just crest the hill at a normal speed.

As for the last part i did read that when coasting the electric motor will put out a slight load.
 

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Yep, if you simply let of the gas to coast, (engine braking) the fuel will likely cut out which is more fuel effecient, but at the same time the computer will add a little regen braking in as well so the extra load will slow you down faster than coasting in nuetral.

I prefer to coast in nuetral going downhill when I can, but leave it in gear if Im afraid of gaining too much speed.
 

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Of course ... coasting downhill in neutral you can build up a great deal more speed than you can in gear.

Is there any wear on the clutch when you coast in neutral with the clutch out vs. coasting in neutral with the clutch in?
 

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Of course ... coasting downhill in neutral you can build up a great deal more speed than you can in gear.

Is there any wear on the clutch when you coast in neutral with the clutch out vs. coasting in neutral with the clutch in?
My understanding is when clutch depressed you are wearing the clutch.

Don't mind me but why coast with clutch depressed?

If you don't need IMA batteries to be charged than coast in neutral keep safe distance from front vehicle for safety will use least amount of fuel from way back when I was taught manual. But I'd read somewhere in this forum that when you coast in gear without compressing throttle (with new technology) you are not using any fuel. Benefit coasting in gear is IMA batteries recharged, engine break, and you have more control of your vehicle. My 2cents. :p

Edit: after rereading daveNajax comments...I agreed 100%.
 

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My understanding is when clutch depressed you are wearing the clutch.

Don't mind me but why coast with clutch depressed?
Years ago, in an owner's manual for an older car (think it was my '89 Prelude) I read that when stopped in neutral with the clutch out there was a small amount of clutch wear. So, I've assumed that when coasting in neutral, it's better to have the clutch in to avoid the possibility of that little bit of clutch wear.
 

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I asked my new mechanic at Honda service about this question. Here is his reply:

Hey Dave, this Abe from Heritage Honda. Bernie had asked me about a question you had regarding your cr-z clutch opeartion while drifting down a hill. Personally on my own 01 civic 5 speed, depending on the road I am travelling on and how long I will be coasting on, I will leave the clutch engaged and leave it the gear I will be going to when I start accelerating again. other times I leave it disengaged with the vehicle in neutral. Either way, you will not put any excessive strain on the clutch. My car still has the original clutch with 150,000 miles on it and I have no problems with slipping or grinding gears.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I've definitely realized better gas mileage coasting in neutral simply because I'll coast further. I will still coast in gear at times, but this is typically when I expect to stop very soon.

Since my first tank I haven't been tracking things. Sunday, I reset my trip and am going to see what kind of fuel economy I get. So far I'm again getting 40-50 mpg during any trip that I'm on the road long enough for the lil bar to fill up adequately, and only am less than that when it's a short around the corner ride. I can only hope this doesn't again end up magically resulting in 35 mpg.
 

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The bar graph is much more optimistic than the digital mpg readout. Go figure.
The only time a clutch will wear is when half engaged. When fully disengaged or fully engaged it will not wear, at least not significantly.
 

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Basically most of the above answers your question.....

Summary:

If the system doesnt see the batteries charging through either coasting in gear (no accelarator) or through the regen braking, it will not count that toward the mileage. And since one of the biggest advantages to the IMA system is assisting the engine from a dead stop... and during accelaration, that will actually lower your "average" mileage. Dont coast in nuetral... the engine will still be using fuel.


I know... I was doing the same thing you are... from long habit in normal standards. When I started using the regen, and not coasting in nuetral...my average mileage went up significantly....
 

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Could someone explain the difference between "instant fuel economy" and the average mpg? According to my average I'm getting between 30-33 mpg but if I'm reading the instant fuel economy (if I understand this right) the entire bar will fill up completely at times and stay there. Usually it stays over the 50 mark in economy mode .

I've only had the car 3 days and have never had a hybrid so this is all new to me.
 

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Could someone explain the difference between "instant fuel economy" and the average mpg? According to my average I'm getting between 30-33 mpg but if I'm reading the instant fuel economy (if I understand this right) the entire bar will fill up completely at times and stay there. Usually it stays over the 50 mark in economy mode .

I've only had the car 3 days and have never had a hybrid so this is all new to me.
The instant fuel economy gauge only populate when your vehicle is moving. Sometimes it does not populate when vehicle come almost to stop. This gauge will indicate poor fuel economy when you are accelerating from stop but will show better fuel economy when coasting. Now if you go down hill and let go of throttle gauge will max out at 100 mpg. This gauge is use for your feedback so you could be more fuel efficient. It is indicating how much fuel you are using at that time due to driving conditions/techniques. Lighten up on throttle when you can to get better fuel economy.

Avg MPG readout is indicating approximate avg mpg for tank (or averaging miles driven per gallon thus far) due to your driving conditions/techniques.

As feedback goes; try to come to traffic speed and lighten up on throttle then reapply gently to maintain speed. See how that would improve your instant readout and eventually better "avg mpg" readout. Make sure keep safe distance ahead of you. Drive safe and good luck. ;)
 
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