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Just for kicks, I drove over to one of our islands today. I reset Trip B once I hit the causeway (55 mph) going onto the island. After driving around the island for a while (and stopping to take a few photos) where the speed limit was 35 mph, I headed back home (mix of 45, 50 and 55 mph) and got a 54.4 mpg average for that trip. This was using Econ at 35-55 mph speeds in very light traffic and the a/c set to auto at 74 degrees. Oh yeah, my car is the EX with CVT and Navi.

Here's the photo I took after getting home...
 

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Simply put for a manual, the best speed for mpgs should be the slowest that you can drive (lowest rpm) in the highest gear. This should be the same for each mode as you only have one set of gears.

The CVT may have different responses as it does adjust the engine speed based upon mode.

However, lugging the engine is not good for the long term. And the lack of response and irritation to other motorists aren't good either.
 

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JnC is right on...the slowest speed will provide the best mpg because of lower wind resistance. But it might be most efficient at 18 mph in 5th gear, rather than 24 mpg in 6th gear (just an example, not necessarily true). And if the road is quite flat, you probably won't be lugging the engine at steady rpm even at these low speeds.

If competing in a time/speed/distance rally in a modern car, it's best to accelerate to the desired speed as quickly as possible, rather than slowly accelerating to the "average" speed. This is because fuel injection is more linear than carburetion with secondary jets that open under hard acceleration. To hit your average speed, if you accelerate slowly, you will have to spend more time at speed higher than the desired average, and that means more wind resistance resulting in lower mpg.
 

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If competing in a time/speed/distance rally in a modern car, it's best to accelerate to the desired speed as quickly as possible, rather than slowly accelerating to the "average" speed. This is because fuel injection is more linear than carburetion with secondary jets that open under hard acceleration. To hit your average speed, if you accelerate slowly, you will have to spend more time at speed higher than the desired average, and that means more wind resistance resulting in lower mpg.
Which is why for the life of me I wish the ECON mode did not remap the throttle position. I'd rather accelerate quickly to speed then drive with a light touch. I suppose that's what the buttons are for, but still...
 

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I don't floor it by any means. But I do try to accelerate to speed in a normal manner then feather the throttle. I keep the revs in a narrow band as I shift. As opposed to spending 2 to 3 times longer at partial throttle to get to the point where I can release the throttle.

My Mini Cooper S has a sport mode with a more responsive throttle. I typically get better mpgs with it in sport mode.
 

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Started out today with 48.5. Lost .2 sitting in driveway taking pics while idling (wasn't thinking). So truely started my day to work with 48.3, it dropped as low as 47.7 just getting to the highway. By the time I got to work I regained everything I lost getting back to 48.5. Completely babied it when I left work for the 15 minute drive to the highway and only lost .1 so I hit the highway with 48.4 I decided to experiment with 5mph under speed limit with cruise on and not touching it. Donald this is the key I believe. By doing 5 under limit, and staying in the far r/h lane I never once had to touch brakes or turn off C/C. And everyone getting on the highway seems to always get in front of me once they see how slow I am going, so in reality I really don't bother anyone getting on or off highway, and absolutely nobody slows me down. Anyway after I returned home I now have 49.2, and yes it is in fact still climbing. I will loose at least .3 to .5 getting back to the highway but I will also regain that back again and just repeat everything again until I see no more increases or have no more fuel-lol...Matter fact I should very well see 50 next time I goto work (Thursday) if the exact same drive that took place today takes place on Thursday. I will take pictures of dash again and post on CR-Z forum cuz I know there will be some non-believers out there...
The above post is from another thread but reminds me of myself 2 years ago when I first got my 2009 Honda fit. I had read on the fit freak forum about some members getting 40+ MPG and it decided to try my best to see what I could achieve. I found that with some effort to be light on the throttle I could get the car's FE gauge to read 40 MPG, but catching an extra traffic light or a little bit of enthusiastic acelleration would cause me to drop back into the high 30s. So I was constantly driving in an effort to hit that magic 40 MPG mark.

I found myself staring at the FE gauge, while trying to make the most of drafting off of other drivers. After a couple months of this I found myself doing unsafe things, like tailgating, because I didn't want to hit the brakes, and cause my FE to drop, and wandering out of lane because I was obsessively watching my FE gauge, I discontinued this practice and just went back to driving normally and just keeping unnecessary accelerations to a minimum.

I did learn a few things about my car from this FE obsession. First was that the use of A/C dropped my FE by 10% (4mpg). I also learned that my fit's optimum speed was 45 mph. Faster than this dropped my FE by about 2.5 MPG/ 5 MPH. Coasting down long grades without touching the brakes or throttle is very effective for increasing FE. Finally I learned that the FE gauge in my fit was optimistic by 10% and when it read 40 MPG I was actually getting 36. Honda eventually issued a service bulletin on this issue and I got the update and now the gauge is fairly accurate (+3%) compared to the actual FE as measured by how much gas I put in the and the number of miles I have driven.

My fit's lifetime (13,541 miles) average FE is presently at 34.4 MPG, down from 36 MPG for the first 5000 miles. I am expecting that the IMA equipped CRZ will be able to help me exceed this by at least 10% (38 MPG). However, to actually make the IMA a worthwhile addition to the fit engine, it would have to increase my average FE by 30% (45 MPG), but based on the reports so far, I don't see that ever being possible.
 
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