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I've received, completed and returned 2 mailed surveys (one being JDPower), took a lengthy online survey, and am sitting here with 2 new mailed surveys-one from Population Research Systems, the other from JDPower.

I'm getting a bit tired of answering numerous similar questions-that online one actually had different questions. Is Honda gonna actually listen-to the wants portion of these surveys, or should I just waste my time balancing my checkbook instead?
 

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Capt'n Jack
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I've received, completed and returned 2 mailed surveys (one being JDPower), took a lengthy online survey, and am sitting here with 2 new mailed surveys-one from Population Research Systems, the other from JDPower.

I'm getting a bit tired of answering numerous similar questions-that online one actually had different questions. Is Honda gonna actually listen-to the wants portion of these surveys, or should I just waste my time balancing my checkbook instead?
Ha, once you do one, then you on the list... :rolleyes: Balancing check book is always a good thing...
 

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I agree I've received far more survey requests for this car than for any previous one I've purchased. And previously I've rarely completed them. This time however, because of all the negative reviews out there I felt somewhat obligated to send these back as a counter and actually have gone to the trouble of filling a # of them out. Especially the JD Power with that crisp dollar bill as incentive:rolleyes:! May not matter much but ya never know. Gotta pick and choose though.
 

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Wait, I got the JD Power one and I didn't get a dollar! I agree, JD Power is important for the car. The Honda survey is important to the sales consultant. If you liked him, help him out. As for one survey begetting another survey, my experience is that the Honda ones are probably not the culprit. JD Power, not so confident.
 

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Well I for one wish like heck you reply to the surveys and express an interest in Honda making a performance version of this great car!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yeah, I am completing them for 2 reasons-to show people actually buy and like the car AND tell Honda where they're doing it wrong. but yeah, i'm feeling kinda like i got hooked and it's not going to stop. like when i had to just call the police on that cult that kept coming to my door...
 

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I agree I've received far more survey requests for this car than for any previous one I've purchased. And previously I've rarely completed them. This time however, because of all the negative reviews out there I felt somewhat obligated to send these back as a counter and actually have gone to the trouble of filling a # of them out. Especially the JD Power with that crisp dollar bill as incentive:rolleyes:! May not matter much but ya never know. Gotta pick and choose though.
:yeahthat:
 

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I used to work in the auto business (corporate produce development). Almost all automakers with a volume presence in North America take the JD Power results seriously. JD Power is hardly the end-all-be-all metric of vehicle reliability and satisfaction, but it would be wrong to assume that the findings are irrelevant.

You will always have blogsphere-hacks and message-board-phenoms commenting about how JD Power is a sham, but that's because these people tend to be very narrow minded in their view.



There are three major reasons for why automakers listen to JD Power:

1) Customers see the JD Power results for "long-term" Vehicle Dependability (VDS) and Initial Quality/satisfaction (IQS). There is a correlation between high JD Power rankings and sales (both volume and margin per sale).

Critics decry JD Power for creating a "shakedown" culture where automakers become fixated on improving the JD Power score versus actually addressing the problems that these arm-chair pundits think are important. But, making tweaks to get good JD Power scores also tends to result in cars most people like (notice how I did not say 100% causal relationship). There is no JD Power question to solicit customer feedback like "get rid of the hybrid system and put in a 200hp turbo). But there is a JD Power question that lets the company learn that "the paint job is poor."

I agree, JD Power toes a very very very thin line. They will gladly "consult" with automakers to make recommendations on how to improve their JD Power scores. But, from what I've seen, JD Power has never given an automaker a higher score just because the company shelled out consulting dollars. I remember one year my company spent a *ton* on JD Power consultants, but they hardly saw the needle move in the JD Power results for surveys handed out after the changes were implemented.



2) The JD Power surveys are the only consistent surveys mailed out to customers of every single make and model between model years. Automakers have a ton of data about their own vehicles and how their model-year variations stack up against their own vehicles.

The benefit of JD Power is that automakers gain a way to compare against the competition in an on objective manner. Now they can see how their vehicle stacks up year over year against their competition.

For example, the people who filled out the JD Power form can rate their cruise control. Maybe the product-planners changed the cruise control stalk layout. Now, the automaker can see if their changes put them on par with other cruise control setups; and the automaker can compare against their previous year results to see if there was improvement.



3) JD Power breaks down feedback between defects and design flaws. For example, a horrible nav system will actually receive negative marks in initial quality even if the nav system works 100% to design intent and was 100% functional with no warranty work. Truth be told, some items are just executed horribly... but consider that to a customer, a horrible nav system is as bad as sqeaky brakes. All these flaws distract from customer satisfaction.

Automakers know which parts have high expense due to warranty claims, but they really don't know how customers rate their cruise control versus the same feature in other cars. JD Power gives them insight. Warranty visits may mean the mechanical quality is low - but it won't tell you if the car is suffering from a slew of design problems.



It's not all perfect though. The primary beef I have with JD Power is that it puts a very short-term focus on engineering. In point #1 above, I put quotes around "long-term." to JD Power, 3-year / 36,000 miles is long term. People who buy used have very little incentive to read JD Power results - and should focus more on Consumer Reports or TrueDelta.com.

Also, another issue is that the definition of "quality" is extremely subjective. You will receive thousands of unique responses if you asked every car buyer to define "quality." This is exasperated with the IQS score being a sum of "design flaws" with "defects" in the 1st year of ownership. So you could have a very reliable car score very poorly in initial quality if the features of the car were poor. Customers cannot get the break-out of the IQS score, but the automakers receive the detail. The result is that customers may pass on a car thinking it is poor "quality" just because many features didn't work to the satisfaction of some survey respondents.



In closing, a large team of people will sit down and scrub over piles of data in an attempt to rationalize a short-term adjustment, engineering changes, mid-model refresh ideas, and new-model features. JD Power is one of the ways (in conjunction with many other data sources) that auto-planning goes from idea to reality. It's not always about feature changes; there are tens of thousands of items that could be addressed.

For example, my front fascia is not lined up. The driver side gap is not up to par... probably 2 mm overhang on the cutline. It looks great on the passenger side though. In addition, there was some noticeable flashing along parts of my center IP and door map pockets. Honda won't know about their build quality being poor unless customers tell them.

Trust me, Honda's assembly in the USA today is *horrible* compared to the ones shipped out of Japan (yay CR-Z!) and their cars in the 90s. But customers aren't complaining - so Honda is going to keep on making things sub-par. When I was in the showroom, I saw Accords and Pilots with doors that were crooked, brake lights that were mis-fit, interior-IP-gap, skewed cut-lines, and a ton of other "Detroit-esque" assembly issues. And I'm not taking a caliper measuring this stuff. I spent a few minutes running my hand along 8 showroom Hondas; and 6 of them contained flaws that never should have made it out of the plant. I cross-shopped Ford... and most of their cars looked very good at a visual inspection (obviously I am not equipped to do a component tear-down).

In my opinion, Ford assembled in the USA is looking better than Honda assembled in the USA. And this is very likely a problem with corporate-product-planning instead of the people on the line. It took a gruesome level of decline before Detroit realized their cars were woefully inferior... we can only hope Honda gets the message before it's too late.
 

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Got the Honda online survey today, quite a monster! Said 15-20 min, took me about 30 (mostly due to hangup in screen changes between pages). Thought a fair amount of redundancy in some ?s. Also at some points you go through pages of ?s and you're stuck on the same percentage complete. Can be quite demoralizing, left wondering will I ever get to the end of this #@%*^???

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