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I currently own a 2013 ex model that is in need of a new engine. I was able to find a 2015 motor for a very nice price. The only thing is it was on an automatic and mine is manual. Are there any major differences I need to be concerned about? I assume I would just be about to transition my manual onto the motor just swapping out the flywheel and all, correct?

thanks,
Joshua
 

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honda part numbers for '13 MT and '15 AT engine blocks are the same, so while there may be more accessory parts that differ, the engines should be interchangeable. 馃
 

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honda part numbers for '13 MT and '15 AT engine blocks are the same, so while there may be more accessory parts that differ, the engines should be interchangeable. 馃
That's what I was thinking. Thinking I'll just pull the trigger. The price is too good to pass it up.
 

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Its amazing how cheap used engines are for these cars. LKQ sells used ones as low as 10,000K for about 700$ shipped.
 

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The only thing you really need to be careful of is to make sure the new engine has the IMA motor installed - Not that there's a difference between the CVT motor and the 6MT motor; but rather that there's some significant danger involved in removing the IMA motor from the engine.
 

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If you're interested, I have a 2013 engine from a 6-speed sitting in my garage. It had 5,000 miles on it, before being pulled for a kSwap. I'm in Ohio, so if you're near, let me know.
 

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If you're interested, I have a 2013 engine from a 6-speed sitting in my garage. It had 5,000 miles on it, before being pulled for a kSwap. I'm in Ohio, so if you're near, let me know.
Damn, I wish I had asked around on here a little sooner. I ended up purchasing the engine already because it was here in NC. I truly appreciate the offer though. Hows the Kswap been? I was actually debating a swap since I needed to replace it.
 

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The only thing you really need to be careful of is to make sure the new engine has the IMA motor installed - Not that there's a difference between the CVT motor and the 6MT motor; but rather that there's some significant danger involved in removing the IMA motor from the engine.
I plan to reuse my IMA and transmission. I have no plans to remove the rotor from the IMA motor, though. I am going to remove it all in one piece. I know that it can be dangerous removing because of how powerful the magnet is. Was there anything else that is cause for caution?
 

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I plan to reuse my IMA and transmission. I have no plans to remove the rotor from the IMA motor, though. I am going to remove it all in one piece. I know that it can be dangerous removing because of how powerful the magnet is. Was there anything else that is cause for caution?
I would be careful removing the motor together vs removing the rotor first. That's a quick way to damage the rotor and stator. Reference:

But since the tool is probably about as expensive as the engine you just bought, if you still want to do it without separating the rotor I'd use a shim between the rotor and stator with brass shims to try to keep it center. That way you can hopefully line it back up with the crankshaft when you're reinstalling on new engine.

Good luck!
 

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Damn, I wish I had asked around on here a little sooner. I ended up purchasing the engine already because it was here in NC. I truly appreciate the offer though. Hows the Kswap been? I was actually debating a swap since I needed to replace it.
Oh, I just got it as a spare, from someone who did a kSwap. I might actually put it in my 1st Gen Insight.... but it's just sitting and waiting for an engine bay to put it in. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
@GoldenCRZ just wondering.. but what happened to your engine? Run it outta oil?
I bought it used with 78k on it a few months ago. A week after buying it the engine developed a slight knock and started throwing the motor rotor position sensor. This caused the IMA system to stop working completely. Took it to honda dealer and a honda specialist, both said the sensor needed to be replaced but there was more than likely another issue causing the sensor to trigger. The knock only got worse with time, so I got it looked at again. Was told the barrings in the bottom of the block were worn causing the knock and the imbalance was throwing the sensor (the original owner more than likely never changed the oil, but it was changed just before it was sold to me). After the prices I was quoted it was easier/cheaper to replace the engine and sensor. Ended up getting the sensor and motor with less than 2k miles out of a 2015 for less than $500.

I would be careful removing the motor together vs removing the rotor first. That's a quick way to damage the rotor and stator. Reference:

But since the tool is probably about as expensive as the engine you just bought, if you still want to do it without separating the rotor I'd use a shim between the rotor and stator with brass shims to try to keep it center. That way you can hopefully line it back up with the crankshaft when you're reinstalling on new engine.

Good luck!
I've watched both parts of this all the way through three times now! It's incredibly informative. I wish he had more coverage/troubleshooting on the IMA system. I'm hoping to be the one that he quotes "may get lucky and not have any trouble at all." lol
 

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I plan to reuse my IMA and transmission. I have no plans to remove the rotor from the IMA motor, though. I am going to remove it all in one piece. I know that it can be dangerous removing because of how powerful the magnet is. Was there anything else that is cause for caution?
As Rossinator said, you risk damaging the components, but you also risk losing a finger installing the rotor back in to the stator housing.
I would be careful removing the motor together vs removing the rotor first. That's a quick way to damage the rotor and stator. Reference:

But since the tool is probably about as expensive as the engine you just bought, if you still want to do it without separating the rotor I'd use a shim between the rotor and stator with brass shims to try to keep it center. That way you can hopefully line it back up with the crankshaft when you're reinstalling on new engine.
Holy cow. those tools are super expensive. I remember seeing a set for sale on here for liek $500 a few years ago... but when you need one, you need one. still would be cheaper than having a shop do all the labor.
I've watched both parts of this all the way through three times now! It's incredibly informative. I wish he had more coverage/troubleshooting on the IMA system. I'm hoping to be the one that he quotes "may get lucky and not have any trouble at all." lol
This guy's videos are top notch. I would not count on being lucky. I would suggest getting some composite wedge shims from the hardware store at the very least if you're dead set on pulling them together.

You might be able to get away with using the transaxle bolt holes as guides to pull the stator assembly off with the rotor still attached to the crankshaft.
 
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