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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I noticed that one of my rear lights was having condensation. When I checked the light cluster, the units are sealed unlike on the old Honda's where it was just a foam piece that covered the openings.
I then noticed that it was the plastic weld join between the light housing and lens that there was a slight split. You can see where there is a split as the area is whiter along the weld. Seems like a common problem on the CRZ lights.
I tried to re-seal using some super glue and pvc weld but found that the adhesive didn't bond well to the plastic or the adhesive is too thin so didn't fill the gap.

I managed to re-seal using some UV clear resin. UV resin is the right viscosity to fill in the gap and doesn't activate/cure until exposed to UV light so any excess can be easily cleaned off.

Here's what I did.
First remove the light cluster by undoing the two bolts then slide out the light cluster. Then used a hair dryer to blow air into the bulb holes to remove the condensation (can take a while).
Turn the light housing up side down and ran some resin along the edge where the lens meets the housing. As the gap is so small, the resin didn't really run into the gap. So using a Stanley knife, I used the blade to slightly open up the gap more. Then dripped some resin into the gap. The resin will seep into and fill the gap. Once there is enough resin in the gap.
Wipe off any excess resin and using a UV lamp. Place the UV lamp along where the resin is filled for a few minutes.
This will activate and harden the resin and bond the plastics together. It should become clear where it was white before.

Hopefully this will fix the condensation issue without having to replace the rear whole light cluster.

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After
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hopefully you were sucessful in removing the moisture, otherwise you just made a sealed biome!

I'll have to give this a try, as I've got an almost identical gap in my seal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
hopefully you were sucessful in removing the moisture, otherwise you just made a sealed biome!

I'll have to give this a try, as I've got an almost identical gap in my seal.
I used a hair dryer to blow warm air into the light housing. Took a while but it removed most of the moisture.
 

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I wonder if you can use a Microwave to force the moisture out prior to reseal? A heat gun maybe too hot so a hair dryer was a good choice.

I used a hair dryer to blow warm air into the light housing. Took a while but it removed most of the moisture.
 

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I thought the LEDs were plug in and easily removed forgot it was a sealed situation. You would be shocked at the temperatures used for wave soldering and assembly of electronics they can take much higher temperatures than you would think but it is right to be cautious.:)

Cuz that won't end badly for the sensitive electronics in the taillight LED panel.
 

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I thought the LEDs were plug in and easily removed forgot it was a sealed situation. You would be shocked at the temperatures used for wave soldering and assembly of electronics they can take much higher temperatures than you would think but it is right to be cautious.:)
High temperature isn't even remotely at all close to why putting a Circuit Board with LEDs in the microwave is a bad idea.
 

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I know the arcing would kill it. I was pretending to be dumb. As I said I thought the LEDs were removable but TBH I never looked at mine that closely. I will be looking for these gaps you are repairing.
High temperature isn't even remotely at all close to why putting a Circuit Board with LEDs in the microwave is a bad idea.
 

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Bake at 250° in the oven for 15-20 minutes; separate the parts; blow dry and reseal with Morimoto RetroRubber resealing glue. :)
 

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Have you done this?
Not to the tail lights, but I've done it to the headlight assembly, which collected more than just a little bit of moisture. The reason I say to take them fully apart and reseal, is because--after removing all the sockets and letting air blow through the assembly for 2-4 hours, condensation came back the next day or two. After "drying" it again, then taking it apart, I found there was still a couple of ounces of water to be poured out of the nooks and crannies. (!)

If you want me to "test" this procedure with the rear light assembly, I actually have a spare (2011-2012) model light that I can open up and reseal. Since I have a 2013, the lens doesn't match (2013+ models have a blue tint to them,) so I'm not worried about messing it up. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Not to the tail lights, but I've done it to the headlight assembly, which collected more than just a little bit of moisture. The reason I say to take them fully apart and reseal, is because--after removing all the sockets and letting air blow through the assembly for 2-4 hours, condensation came back the next day or two. After "drying" it again, then taking it apart, I found there was still a couple of ounces of water to be poured out of the nooks and crannies. (!)

If you want me to "test" this procedure with the rear light assembly, I actually have a spare (2011-2012) model light that I can open up and reseal. Since I have a 2013, the lens doesn't match (2013+ models have a blue tint to them,) so I'm not worried about messing it up. :)
I don't think it will be necessary.
 

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I am currently having exactly the same issue with one of my tail lights at the moment. So I want to try the method in the first post by @kingmonkey8. I have two questions about this:
  1. What UV resin would you recommend?
  2. Would a silicone sealant also work for this method or would its viscosity be too high to go into the opening/weld?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I am currently having exactly the same issue with one of my tail lights at the moment. So I want to try the method in the first post by @kingmonkey8. I have two questions about this:
  1. What UV resin would you recommend?
  2. Would a silicone sealant also work for this method or would its viscosity be too high to go into the opening/weld?
I used some clear UV resin I bought off ebay. You can use the small keyring UV lights. They work.
Silicone sealant is too thick to get into any gaps. You could use silicone to seal from the outside.
 
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