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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all!

I’m based in the UK and hopefully a soon to be crz owner (well.... my girlfriend). The idea is for her to get a small reliable and economical car that can take her on her 20 mile each way commute each day, without having to break the bank, and also be a bit sporty and fun.

I’m pretty mechanically minded and will do most work myself, however a hybrid system is naturally something I’ve never come across in a car personally. I’m looking to understand the actually reliability for the battery system.
Now, I understand that the warranty for the system i think is 6 years and 60,000 miles (I think) and the cars were looking at in our price range will be outside this. I know the cars are pretty bullet proof but the only thing to bear in mind is this needing to be replaced. How much actual evidence has there been on this forum of these going and needing to be replaced? I know the cost is likely to be over £1000. The cars were looking at are probably around the 70,000-90,000 mile mark and no older than 2011.

Just really looking to see if it’s something pretty much all cars need replacing at 100,000 miles, or it’s more like the odd one here and there?

Any help would be much appreciated!

Thanks
Sam
 

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Welcome to the forum and for asking the most common question all new members ask whether they own a CR-Z or are considering it.

This has been asked and answered many times but I will take the time to answer you specifically.

Not one member of this forum has had to replace the IMA (Integrated Motor Assist or Hybrid) battery on a CR-Z yet ( Litz replaced one in a first generation Insight).

This is a gas engine ( ICE in today's speak ) car with a Hybrid (IMA) system to extend range. It can't and won't run 100% electric. Car can run with a bad Hybrid battery but not a bad IMA motor ( it charges the under hood battery and there is no alternator). Some have had to replace the under hood battery more often than a normal Gas car. Other unique issues people have had is having to replace the IPU fan( part of the hybrid system) or the DC to DC converter ( Kind of like an alternator on a "regular" car) Some have had to replace both.

Make sure any CR-Z you purchase you have the under hood battery load tested. Biggest common thing any of us will tell you is if you get any warnings, messages or other weirdness either load test the under hood battery or just replace it before doing any other service. When it fails you will get all kinds of lights on the dash and some will have the scary letters of IMA. The battery gauge on the dash is for the level of charge in the IMA ( big expensive hybrid battery in the back). There is no under hood battery monitoring. When testing a CR-Z prior to purchase try all three driving modes and see if battery shows charge and discharge. If any part of the hybrid system is not working the car will go into "Limp Home" and the driving modes will not work, stability control is also disabled.

Car usually starts using the IMA motor/generator and IMA battery but if IMA charge is low or air temp is very low or both there is an "emergency" conventional starter which many of us have never heard and some don't believe the car has till they hear it. Due to the uniqueness of this system A CR-Z will work much longer with a dying( low voltage or charge) under hood (bonnet) battery than other cars but you need a minimum charge in that battery to start the process and the ( many will argue this point) CR-Z does not charge this battery 100% of the time when the car is being driven. Add to that Auto stop and you can understand why I recommend frequent 12 Volt battery load tests.

To keep all batteries happy drive car often. Honda says to drive 30 minutes (continuously) a month. We recommend if car has to sit for any period of time put under hood battery on a trickle charger and if for a long time(Storage) remove Back up fuse ( same one that was removed for shipping from Japan).

Please search the forum and read up on these unique cars. A good place to start is ABC's for the CR-Z and as for the battery a simple search will find you many threads use search term "Battery Life"( Some will refer to the 12 Volt under hood ( or bonnet as you say there) battery).

In Summary forget it is a Hybrid and there are many other things to worry about. Do all the same checks you would do with any other car you are considering buying.
 

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I totally concur with spdbump.
After getting mine a year back, I have had no IMA problems, just weak 12v. Some bargains about for under4- 5k and the odd 2013 ( better spec) for 6k-7k
There is a 2013 on Ebay (but a cat s) for 5k ish.
Buy and enjoy and if ever near north Tyneside give me a shout!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Welcome to the forum and for asking the most common question all new members ask whether they own a CR-Z or are considering it.

This has been asked and answered many times but I will take the time to answer you specifically.

Not one member of this forum has had to replace the IMA (Integrated Motor Assist or Hybrid) battery on a CR-Z yet ( Litz replaced one in a first generation Insight).

This is a gas engine ( ICE in today's speak ) car with a Hybrid (IMA) system to extend range. It can't and won't run 100% electric. Car can run with a bad Hybrid battery but not a bad IMA motor ( it charges the under hood battery and there is no alternator). Some have had to replace the under hood battery more often than a normal Gas car. Other unique issues people have had is having to replace the IPU fan( part of the hybrid system) or the DC to DC converter ( Kind of like an alternator on a "regular" car) Some have had to replace both.

Make sure any CR-Z you purchase you have the under hood battery load tested. Biggest common thing any of us will tell you is if you get any warnings, messages or other weirdness either load test the under hood battery or just replace it before doing any other service. When it fails you will get all kinds of lights on the dash and some will have the scary letters of IMA. The battery gauge on the dash is for the level of charge in the IMA ( big expensive hybrid battery in the back). There is no under hood battery monitoring. When testing a CR-Z prior to purchase try all three driving modes and see if battery shows charge and discharge. If any part of the hybrid system is not working the car will go into "Limp Home" and the driving modes will not work, stability control is also disabled.

Car usually starts using the IMA motor/generator and IMA battery but if IMA charge is low or air temp is very low or both there is an "emergency" conventional starter which many of us have never heard and some don't believe the car has till they hear it. Due to the uniqueness of this system A CR-Z will work much longer with a dying( low voltage or charge) under hood (bonnet) battery than other cars but you need a minimum charge in that battery to start the process and the ( many will argue this point) CR-Z does not charge this battery 100% of the time when the car is being driven. Add to that Auto stop and you can understand why I recommend frequent 12 Volt battery load tests.

To keep all batteries happy drive car often. Honda says to drive 30 minutes (continuously) a month. We recommend if car has to sit for any period of time put under hood battery on a trickle charger and if for a long time(Storage) remove Back up fuse ( same one that was removed for shipping from Japan).

Please search the forum and read up on these unique cars. A good place to start is ABC's for the CR-Z and as for the battery a simple search will find you many threads use search term "Battery Life"( Some will refer to the 12 Volt under hood ( or bonnet as you say there) battery).

In Summary forget it is a Hybrid and there are many other things to worry about. Do all the same checks you would do with any other car you are considering buying.
Thank you for this Spdbump. It really is appreciated!

I know this subject has been asked many times, but I was more concerned around whether this has actually happened or not in terms of them failing which I wasn't able to find. But you have answered this now so thank you (y).

We've got one lined up to look at on Saturday. It's a 2011 with 75,000 miles. I'm just double checking any other typical consumables that may need changing in the not too distant future. Brakes have been changed recently and I will service myself, I also know they're chain driven so another thing not to worry about (hopefully). Do you guys have much of an idea about clutch life? I see the odd one here and there has had to have the clutch replaced at less than 100k miles. Is this something that generally goes before the 100k mark?
 

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My clutch started to feel worn after about 210k of hard driving miles. Like straight up years of beating on it.

You are asking questions that seemingly get asked over and over and over again. ;)

Just go and check it out. Every car has its own personality.
 

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Gilb, go for it. The car is overloaded with electronics but seems pretty reliable.
Within your budget you will only have to worry about normal wear and tear. My clutch is still absolutely solid at 70+k as is everything else, brake pads go on forever!!
Just be aware of the 12v and replace it when anything goes amiss.
Good luck
 

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Buy a LI-ION jump starter and treat like any other car but make sure it gets driven often. All used cars are 1 of 1 so be suspicious and fully checkout the car.

what’s a clutch?🤪 I have a CVT
 

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There are differences between the batteries - older ones such as mine use NIMH cells, newer ones are lithium. I think - and I'm trying to remember - that the NIMHs were cheaper to replace if they fail, but I'm sure someone better placed can verify this.

As someone who has had 105k trouble free miles, I'd consider the cost and availability of parts to be something you should consider. My driveshaft snapped and this is not common per se, but also not unheard of either arguably due to a design flaw.

Anyway, I could only get one via a main dealer who charged nearly 1500 with fitting. A Civic driveshaft costs much less.

Not trying to put you off, but if you do need parts your realistically often going to paying main dealer prices which seem to be heightened due to the cars rarity. In my head if offset this against the otherwise very cheap running costs (tax, no cambelt, mpg, insurance etc)
 
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