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I Google sgv\626 that california. So how the hell do you do that? What year, cvt? I drive under 2500 rpm
and get 42 mostly highway
The hills in California seem to be hybrid-friendly. I once was leaving LA to come home and got up to 62mpg doing 65 behind an 18-wheeler. I'll dig up the photo if I can.
 

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These the photos we need:) wasnt hating on you, Just wanted to point that out. It completly amazes me when folks get mpg like this. brovo. keep doing you:)
well it wasnt easy to do and that was quite awhile back. the point of my initial post was just to kinda show that even FI Zs can hypermile but yes i know and youre right that was only the first 5.5 miles of the tank. ive actually been struggling on the tank since then because the outside temp went up and my tire pressure went down to like 41 psi cold so i gotta add air im also a bit rusty on my hyper technique so I know I can do better with practice. my 50 mpg tank was pre hpd so I dont plan to reach that again. I also had a much different route back then than I do now. lately ove been doong a lot of uphill so im struggling
 

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The hills in California seem to be hybrid-friendly. I once was leaving LA to come home and got up to 62mpg doing 65 behind an 18-wheeler. I'll dig up the photo if I can.
the 110 south is my favorite. esp. in traffic because its not as bad holding everyone up when theres traffic but when its clear ppl love to tailgate instead of go around. im still recalibrating my technique to get it back up to where i had before. like using too much of thw ima at once might be bad if u end up needing it later and have no battery to help u so im really working on throttle control. also early braking and looking ahead
 

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I Google sgv\626 that california. So how the hell do you do that? What year, cvt? I drive under 2500 rpm
and get 42 mostly highway
6mt:thumbsup: 2013
i have the mugen wing working against me and also one of my sideskirts is not flush due to damage so this creates drag im sure. my tires are the re760 sports so im sure they have quite a higher rolling resistance than the stock dunlops.

if you have cvt you will have to really focus on maximizing the autostop i would imagine (engage it a lot sooner and roll with motor off). and idk if neutral coast is a good thing to be doing in a cvt (probably not). perhaps FAS might be something to consider but its one of the more extreme techniques and many will argue dangerous. wellll actually nevermind FASing cuz if you can do that then neutral glide would also be fine. sorry i dont know more about CVT. id really like one day a CVTer to let me mess around with the car so i could learn it and teach others but not so easy to find someone closeby and willing (any volunteers?). in the cvt u will also be able to pulse but the car will be in gear. which is fine as your ima will recharge off throttle. u just wont get the same glide distance as a 6mt in neutral
 

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I have 2011, you have a better battery. My tires are at 35 psi, ur at 40. Isn't 40 psi too high?
Check the sidewall of your tire for max inflation PSI. My Direzza ZIIs (215/45R17) are rated for 50, so 40 is no problem.

I keep my summer set of tires around 41f/38r and there is no sign of uneven wear after thousands of miles on softer 200 UTQG tires. Over inflated tires (too much pressure for the weight they support) would show increased wear in the middle.

Moving from Honda's suggested 32 PSI up to ~40 was good for 2-3 mpg. Good enough to get my mpg back in line with what I get on the stock wheels/tires.

Chalking the tires has shown me that less than 40 PSI in the front allows the tire to roll over onto the sidewall, but that's under autox exuberance.

Having spent +40k miles in both an '11 with the old battery and a '13 with the updated one, I can tell you that the real world mpg is very similar.
 

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So I got 49 or 50 mpg going into work. I drafted behind 3 different large tractor trailors. I typically get 42 going into work. Going home I was at 47, the there was a traffic jam, had to take a detour, can't compare it now. Tomorrow morning I'll A/B so I can get an exact number.
 

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6mt:thumbsup: 2013
i have the mugen wing working against me and also one of my sideskirts is not flush due to damage so this creates drag im sure. my tires are the re760 sports so im sure they have quite a higher rolling resistance than the stock dunlops.

if you have cvt you will have to really focus on maximizing the autostop i would imagine (engage it a lot sooner and roll with motor off). and idk if neutral coast is a good thing to be doing in a cvt (probably not). perhaps FAS might be something to consider but its one of the more extreme techniques and many will argue dangerous. wellll actually nevermind FASing cuz if you can do that then neutral glide would also be fine. sorry i dont know more about CVT. id really like one day a CVTer to let me mess around with the car so i could learn it and teach others but not so easy to find someone closeby and willing (any volunteers?). in the cvt u will also be able to pulse but the car will be in gear. which is fine as your ima will recharge off throttle. u just wont get the same glide distance as a 6mt in neutral
The trick to mpg coasting in a CVT is to use light brake pedal pressure and let the engine shut down. Once the engine is off the CVT clutch disengages and you can coast a little way - or a lot if you are on a slight hill - keeping the brake pedal lightly pressed to keep the engine off but the brakes physically disengaged.

One can also drop the transmission into neutral as well but honestly you're better off staying in gear and packing as much juice back into the battery as much as possible unless you have a long downhill slope and no obstacles ahead of you. The CVT isn't as good at recovering battery power at lower speeds as the MT is.

 

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CRZ Hypermilling Techniques (Please Share)

I'd like to compile a user-made guide of the techniques used by our forum members on how they drive their vehicles for best MPG. We can all share our own tip's and perhaps learn a few along the way.

I'll get it started and I'll add to the OP as you reply below.
Depending on consensus, items may be removed due to conflicting information.

1. Drive quickly to 2k RPM and drift as long as you can.
2. Get uphill momentum before hitting the hill and try to find a good RPM to keep it there.
3. Keeping speed doesn't need much acceleration. Find the least RPM that can keep you moving at a constant rate.
4. Tap the break's lightly while coasting to get maximum battery regeneration.

Thanks in advance. :) :thumbsup:
 

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I actually would argue against encouraging regen while coasting. Every time you turn one form of energy into another you lose something, as the conversion is never 100% efficient. You're better off keeping that energy as kinetic and capturing it when you have to slow down.

And when you do have to slow, as much as you can keep off your brakes. Same reason, and some of the braking won't regen it'll go into the pads as heat which is totally wasted. If you can't stop in time without using your brakes, you approached that stop too quickly (from a hypermiler perspective). I can often coast up to a red light with no brakes and fuel cut off from a ways out, then as the car gets down to 6mph and the engine tries to restart I touch the brakes and go into autostop - the CVT clutch disengages and I can coast a bit further. It's not unusual to go a quarter mile or more without any gas - that's infinite MPG to add to the trip average.

This technique (driving without brakes) needs lots of planning ahead and cooperative traffic flow, and an eye on the energy flow gauge on the iMID to know when you're in fuel cutoff.

I also noticed that if you hold the throttle at speed you'll usually have your mpg just under 40-50 on the instant readout, but if you lift off just a smidge (almost just a toe wiggle...) it'll get above 50mpg and you won't lose much if any speed, but you can go like that for a half mile or so without affecting traffic flow much. A half mile above 50 is way different than a half mile below 50mpg.

On cold mornings going down hill I coast in neutral - yes the engine is in idle, but on cold mornings it won't go into fuel cutoff and I'm using gas to go downhill - with all the friction losses I'm better off coasting in neutral, at least according to the instant MPG display.

I cannot overstate the importance of watching the energy transfer and instant fuel readout as you try different things. After a while it'll become second nature.
 

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I actually would argue against encouraging regen while coasting. Every time you turn one form of energy into another you lose something, as the conversion is never 100% efficient. You're better off keeping that energy as kinetic and capturing it when you have to slow down.
The problem with this statement is that the computer software will recharge the battery power you used to accelerate with gasoline if you don't re-stock the charge with regen. This places a load on the engine which is worse the lower your IMA battery voltage becomes.

So, the load on the engine is noticable when this charging occurs, though it is fairly well hidden with this IMA design. On my 1st gen Insight the system would trickle charge the battery to 100% and then resume charging when the battery dropped below 90%. This was easily detected because regen braking would shut off as well. With the battery topped off I would get 5~10mpg extra. This was a CVT Insight and over the 12 years I had it topping off the battery was always more effective than coasting in neutral.



On the CR-Z it appears Honda either reduces the charging at an 80% state of charge, or begins using the stored energy more often at that point. I rarely see the last battery charge light come on and have not yet had regen shut off due to a full battery - though I'm sure a long downhill ride would do this. The overall behavior does seem to hold vs. the Insight though, keeping the IMA battery topped off seems to be the best way I can find to get repeatable 50~55mpg numbers on a regular basis with the CVT transmission.

Light brake pedal use is also important, I do notice the brakes do not seem to activate with light pressure. Once the computer is done recharging the battery and disengages the CVT clutch I can detect no difference in rolling resistance between the pedal pressure I use to activate regen and no brake pedal pressure at all. Your point there is important though, to get good mileage requires not using brakes as much as possible and good planning for stops when it is safe to do so - regardless if one is using regen or coast mode.
 

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The problem with this statement is that the computer software will recharge the battery power you used to accelerate with gasoline if you don't re-stock the charge with regen. This places a load on the engine which is worse the lower your IMA battery voltage becomes.

So, the load on the engine is noticable when this charging occurs, though it is fairly well hidden with this IMA design. On my 1st gen Insight the system would trickle charge the battery to 100% and then resume charging when the battery dropped below 90%. This was easily detected because regen braking would shut off as well. With the battery topped off I would get 5~10mpg extra. This was a CVT Insight and over the 12 years I had it topping off the battery was always more effective than coasting in neutral.



On the CR-Z it appears Honda either reduces the charging at an 80% state of charge, or begins using the stored energy more often at that point. I rarely see the last battery charge light come on and have not yet had regen shut off due to a full battery - though I'm sure a long downhill ride would do this. The overall behavior does seem to hold vs. the Insight though, keeping the IMA battery topped off seems to be the best way I can find to get repeatable 50~55mpg numbers on a regular basis with the CVT transmission.

Light brake pedal use is also important, I do notice the brakes do not seem to activate with light pressure. Once the computer is done recharging the battery and disengages the CVT clutch I can detect no difference in rolling resistance between the pedal pressure I use to activate regen and no brake pedal pressure at all. Your point there is important though, to get good mileage requires not using brakes as much as possible and good planning for stops when it is safe to do so - regardless if one is using regen or coast mode.
I think the energy management is better on the CRZ. My civic hybrid (2008) suffers when in "forced regen" mode and yes, energy management is a bit of an issue, but even then I found ways to manage it without braking on a cruise.

Remember that all energy, including regen, comes from gasoline - it's just that regen starts out as gasoline, to kinetic, then friction/regen. Gasoline/regen can work better, in the right setting.

I've found it hard to detect regen versus brake on the CR-Z. On the civic it's blatantly obvious, but I still use a light touch out of habit. The near seamless integration of the system is actually something Honda can be proud of - on many hybrids the system is, by all accounts, quite intrusive.

Epic MPG by the way ;-)
 

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best advice imho is to drive slowly..you could easily get 55+ on the highway if you keep it under 50..prob is its dangerous to drive that slow most times
 

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Previously I stated that you should drive quickly to desired MPH and coast, but now after slowly pressing down on the gas while keeping 35-40mpg on the dash, I've achieved 43mpg on a trip that usually gave me 26mpg. This isn't pleasant because people behind you really don't care that you're hypermiling, but what a few seconds of awkwardness for high MPG? LOL. I also changed my gas from 87 to 91 and immediately felt a different in my butt dyno. Also, I felt I could sustain higher speeds with better MPG readings. Anyway, I tried to race this around, but I realize that I only win cars my size. I thought that'd be a deal breaker, but I realized the MPG potential and the futuristic style was worth every penny and feel good about the environment while doing it.
 

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Wow, So now that I'm figuring out how to drive this thing I just achieved 46mpg on my way to work. I usually was around 28-29 with my previous driving habits. I'm really starting to love this car.
 

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Alright, so I put 87 back in again! LOL, Yes, the experiment continues. Again, I'm logging in lower MPG on both highway and street. 36 for high way... 20-25 for street. I'm pretty darn sure now that there is a big difference between the two.
 

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Alright, so I put 87 back in again! LOL, Yes, the experiment continues. Again, I'm logging in lower MPG on both highway and street. 36 for high way... 20-25 for street. I'm pretty darn sure now that there is a big difference between the two.
I think you are finding out that the biggest factor in MPG is your driving habits.

As for octane, the only TRUE method is to do a blind test(not knowing whats in your tank)under controlled repeatable conditions. Even if there WAS a difference(I remain unconvinced) the difference would be swallowed up by your driving style.
 
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