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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

UK owner of a black 12 reg CR-Z.
My car has grey cloth seats and these are proving a nightmare to keep clean.
Water stains are the issue.

Got a quote from Supagard £199 3 year warranty for the fabric protection. Anyone had this product used on the seats or recommend a fabric protector?
Also does anyone know what material the seats are? The side panels seem to be a mesh-type?

I've tried cleaning them with upholstery cleaner but it looks like I'm making it worse.

Any help would be much appreciated!
Cheers
Calvin
 

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Look into excellent fitting PVC and leather or suede seat covers from Clazzio.com made for the CR-Z.
They won't be much more than your quote, will look and feel fantastic, and you can customize the colour to your taste.

My CDN $0.02, anyway.
 

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Has anyone tried having a pro detailer try it? I have "dusty" areas in the door trim that evade orders to evacuate.
 

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Easiest solution is probably Canadian's recommendation. I've seen mixed results from attempting to clean the cloth on the seats but there has to be a good method.

Best (however most involved) solution would probably be to remove all the OEM covers and fully wash them off the seats. Item9 has a writeup somewhere on removing and installing the individual covers from the seat pads which requires removing the seats from the vehicle. I would like to do this someday but it will likely take several hours from start to finish.

Yours don't look too bad but I can understand that it can be unsightly. They grey is nice in helping keep the interior temps down but shows dirt far too easily if it gets wet like entering the car with a rain-soaked jacket.
 

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Yup.. i stopped dealing with mine while they were still in good condition.

Covered them in some clazzios and never looked back!!
 

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Not a problem in my CR-Z, because I had the interior treated (need to find out what they used, as it needs another treatment because I swapped interior with a 2016.) I didn't realize just how much protection it provided until I got the seats that had NO protection. I've heard that a 50/50 solution of water and hydrogen peroxide is good for the organic stains, but I haven't tried that just yet. Another tip I heard about for the door panels is to use a 50/50 solution of water and isopropyl alcohol and many rags to blot-clean/dry the material.

My interior is a darker color, so it doesn't show dirt as much, but my 2002 Insight has the similar gray interior as the earlier model CR-Zs, and a few years ago I took the fabric off the seats and gave them a good cleaning. I was amazed how great they looked afterwards. It was a 2-day job, all said and done, and I think I put them in the washing machine--not sure about the clothes dryer--but, once you get them cleaned, I'd suggest looking into some protectant/sealer--one kind for the leather, and another for the fabric to keep the crap on the surface, instead of imbedding into the material.:wink2:
 

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I used a stain removal. RedEX.

It removes the dirt and any stains, but since i'm not very knowledgeful in detailing, i might over spray and get "clean" stains ^^.
It's hard to spray it evenly on that cloth as it absorbs irregularly. But i'm guessing if you "bathe" the seats evenly, it will make all of them clean.

Clazzio is also an option, but then you have to keep the covers clean aswell anyway, just a different material.
For those State side it's definetely a good option
 

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Use an automotive fabric cleaner. Once clean use Never wet for fabric or Scotch Guard to protect. I have used my Bissel steam carpet cleaner with hand tool to clean mine it works well but you have to wait hours for the seats to dry.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for all the comments guys. Bit of an annoying one as I do love the light colour grey seats. They really do stand out very nicely. As stated in the comments the material does absorb differently leaving dry marks around the material which is a pain. The door panels are the same material as the seat panels- almost like a meshy cloth type. I'm wondering if it's worth taking it to a professional valet company who will shampoo and dry the seats properly then apply a fabric protector. I think the main issue is actually drying ones cleaned without leaving dry spots or streaks
 

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I deal with these type of stains on the regular as a detailer. You want to get an APC (All Purpose Cleaner) and soak the seat pretty thoroughly and have a interior scrub brush to lightly agitate the material and then vac up the moisture. Let stand and dry for a few and if that doesnt work then we have a product called vac-a-way that does it almost everytime.
 

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I deal with these type of stains on the regular as a detailer. You want to get an APC (All Purpose Cleaner) and soak the seat pretty thoroughly and have a interior scrub brush to lightly agitate the material and then vac up the moisture. Let stand and dry for a few and if that doesnt work then we have a product called vac-a-way that does it almost everytime.
IMHO Your method will deteriorate the foam inside the seat. You want to use as little cleaner as possible and extract it from the fabric as quick as possible. You want to avoid soaking the seats especially the foam and wiring for the airbags.:|
This is why I very gingerly use my Bissel with fabric cleaner and use it very sparingly. It leaves the fabric damp not soaked. Sometimes I will use a lot of ( white) terry towels( which have been washed without fabric softener) to dry the seats.

If you use your method I hope you dilute the cleaner and do not use it straight. Even Simple Green has dilution directions for different uses.
 

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I deal with these type of stains on the regular as a detailer. You want to get an APC (All Purpose Cleaner) and soak the seat pretty thoroughly and have a interior scrub brush to lightly agitate the material and then vac up the moisture. Let stand and dry for a few and if that doesnt work then we have a product called vac-a-way that does it almost everytime.
Once you finally get the fabric clean, is there any product you use to protect it--to keep stains from seeping into the material? It seems like you'll need one product to do the fabric, and another to do the vinyl (for sealing/keeping the stains out in the first place.)
 

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Once you finally get the fabric clean, is there any product you use to protect it--to keep stains from seeping into the material? It seems like you'll need one product to do the fabric, and another to do the vinyl (for sealing/keeping the stains out in the first place.)
An APC will work well with vinyl too. And yes we use a product from G Technique called " I1 Smart Fabric Platinum". Works great to keep stains out. We also have one for leather/vinyl from G technique we use called "L1 Leather Guard". But you can really use any leather cream for the seats it will keep them from cracking and keep them soft.
 

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IMHO Your method will deteriorate the foam inside the seat. You want to use as little cleaner as possible and extract it from the fabric as quick as possible. You want to avoid soaking the seats especially the foam and wiring for the airbags.:|
This is why I very gingerly use my Bissel with fabric cleaner and use it very sparingly. It leaves the fabric damp not soaked. Sometimes I will use a lot of ( white) terry towels( which have been washed without fabric softener) to dry the seats.

If you use your method I hope you dilute the cleaner and do not use it straight. Even Simple Green has dilution directions for different uses.
Okay, I guess I should not have said "soak", but you definitely dont have to use sparingly. It will leave the seat damp but not all stains are bad enough to require this method. Some only take a quick spray and wipe.
 

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Okay, I guess I should not have said "soak", but you definitely dont have to use sparingly. It will leave the seat damp but not all stains are bad enough to require this method. Some only take a quick spray and wipe.
OK, You know best and do this for a living. But I have had seats repaired or recovered in the past and have seen the damage caused to the foam by chemicals that were used to clean them. Have you ever removed the upholstery and inspected the foam or are you just presuming based on looking at the seats before and after?
 

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OK, You know best and do this for a living. But I have had seats repaired or recovered in the past and have seen the damage caused to the foam by chemicals that were used to clean them. Have you ever removed the upholstery and inspected the foam or are you just presuming based on looking at the seats before and after?
Well, before I got into detailing I worked for an Upholstery shop as a shop hand. Didnt do a whole lot of sewing or anything just started learning the basics. But I did work with A LOT of seats. And I can tell you that the foam is going to go out from normal wear and tear of getting in and out of the car long before the one or two times you need to get crazy stains out over a couple year period. This method isnt for a weekly detail by any means. I just said it works if you have a tough stain.
 

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Once you finally get the fabric clean, is there any product you use to protect it--to keep stains from seeping into the material? It seems like you'll need one product to do the fabric, and another to do the vinyl (for sealing/keeping the stains out in the first place.)
I used NeverWet for fabric it seems to help.

NEVERWET FABRIC is a one-step, superhydrophobic, water repelling treatment designed to keep items dry longer. This crystal clear formula preserves outdoor items against damaging moisture without changing the look or feel of the fabric.

  • Easy single step trigger spray application
  • Crystal clear formula
  • Great for shoes, outdoor patio furniture, backpacks, gloves, camping gear, and more
  • Ideal for leather, suede, polyester, cotton/poly blends, and canvas.
  • Coverage will vary depending on fabric: 20-60 sq. ft.
  • Not recommended for interior carpet & upholstery
  • Available in a 11 oz bottle (larger size available in Industrial products – NeverWet DWR)
For Best Results Hold the spray bottle 12-16” from surface and coat the entire object until wet. Do not soak or allow to puddle.
 

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Well, before I got into detailing I worked for an Upholstery shop as a shop hand. Didnt do a whole lot of sewing or anything just started learning the basics. But I did work with A LOT of seats. And I can tell you that the foam is going to go out from normal wear and tear of getting in and out of the car long before the one or two times you need to get crazy stains out over a couple year period. This method isnt for a weekly detail by any means. I just said it works if you have a tough stain.
The point I was trying to make is automobile seats unlike seats in boats are not designed to be soaked in chemicals. Yes, the foam will deteriorate on its own but why should we help it? As I keep vehicles decades I am as gentle as I can be on my vehicles when cleaning to prevent having to pay lots of money to repair things that I damaged by over zealous methods of cleaning. Lets just agree to disagree.:smile2:
 

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An APC will work well with vinyl too. And yes we use a product from G Technique called " I1 Smart Fabric Platinum". Works great to keep stains out. We also have one for leather/vinyl from G technique we use called "L1 Leather Guard". But you can really use any leather cream for the seats it will keep them from cracking and keep them soft.
Thanks for the tips--I don't remember the brand of sealer/protectant I have on hand, but I used to use 303 Protectant, but it must have gotten "lost" when I cleaned out the garage the last time, LOL. One thing I noticed while reading the instructions of what I was going to use recently, was that the fabric sealer said not to use on vinyl, and the vinyl instructions said not to use on fabrics, but I'm sure I used the 303 protectant on the whole seats of the cars I used to have, even though they had cloth inserts and leather trim. I'm not sure what the 303 instructions said, so it's possible that it's not recommended for both materials; just for vinyl/leather.
 
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