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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since the car gets great gas mileage I thought useing a higher grade gas would be better. What grade gas do you guys/girls use.
 

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All the higher grades means is a higher Octane to prevent detonation of the fuel for your higher compression engines. Since the CR-Z engine is not considered high compression it doesn't need it, so it is a waste of money.
 

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Run what the manufaturer states. Using higher octane won't give you more power. The higher the octane, the slower it burns. Using high octane pump will actually make your engine dirtier, valves specifically.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Manual states using 87 Octane, most gas stations in our area carry 86 Octane (Reg) or 91 Octane (Premium), most don't have the 88 because they made room for Diesel.

Which is better to go with, the slightly lower octane (86) or the higher (91)? :confused:
 

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In the UK, the std stuff is 95 RON (octane), the higher stuff like Shell Optimax & Tesco's 'Super' is 100 RON.
So - over here we are using higher octane levels than you guys to start with... and just DONT get me started again on the prices per litre or the std unleaded (currently 1.19.9 :angry:)
 

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In the UK, the std stuff is 95 RON (octane), the higher stuff like Shell Optimax & Tesco's 'Super' is 100 RON.
So - over here we are using higher octane levels than you guys to start with... and just DONT get me started again on the prices per litre or the std unleaded (currently 1.19.9 :angry:)
This is not exactly the whole truth. In Europe, the stated octane is RON in the US the stated octane on the pump is an average of RON (Research Octane Rating) and MON (Motor Octane Number). The MON is usually 8 to 10 points lower than RON, so the average comes out 4 to 5 points lower. Therefore the 95 RON octane in Europe is equivalent to 90 octane in the US. Now this is still more than typical 87 regular grade in the US.
 

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Good to know, and it makes sense because you had to use Super in the S2000 which has a higher compression ratio (that engine is a work of art).

While we're dispelling myths about petrol, I'll just also add that there's nothing wrong with supermarket petrol. I was involved in supply chain management for Sainsbury's petrol stations a few years ago and I can confirm that it's the exact same stuff that's delivered to Shell, Esso, BP etc. They may or may not put beneficial additives in it, but their fuel is no more or less clean than the supermarkets.

Much of the price difference is due to the different objectives: the oil companies are trying to make most of their profit from their fuel, whereas the supermarkets only want to cover their costs and make a modest profit. Their goal is to get you into their stores, because even if you just buy a tank of fuel and pick up some bread and milk, they'll probably make more money than than the oil company would have. So if you fill up when you get your weekly shop...
 

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I can confirm that it's the exact same stuff that's delivered to Shell, Esso, BP etc. They may or may not put beneficial additives in it, but their fuel is no more or less clean than the supermarkets.
If additives are added - how can it be the same fuel? Are additives added to keep the engine cleaner and therefore burn fuel more economically?

Much of the price difference is due to the different objectives: the oil companies are trying to make most of their profit from their fuel, whereas the supermarkets only want to cover their costs and make a modest profit. Their goal is to get you into their stores, because even if you just buy a tank of fuel and pick up some bread and milk, they'll probably make more money than than the oil company would have. So if you fill up when you get your weekly shop...
IMO: because of this difference, to remain in business Shell, Esso, BP etc have to offer something different. After all they are the ones developing the fuel, so they keep the better grade for themselves, add additives to make it go further, and sell the lower grade to the supermarkets.

I switched from supermarket fuel to BP (closest branded station) and my £/mile slightly improved because my MPG got better. Due to my Z being my DD, short trips - low revs. I would rather have the additives, a clean engine and better MPG.
 

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If additives are added - how can it be the same fuel? Are additives added to keep the engine cleaner and therefore burn fuel more economically?



IMO: because of this difference, to remain in business Shell, Esso, BP etc have to offer something different. After all they are the ones developing the fuel, so they keep the better grade for themselves, add additives to make it go further, and sell the lower grade to the supermarkets.

I switched from supermarket fuel to BP (closest branded station) and my £/mile slightly improved because my MPG got better. Due to my Z being my DD, short trips - low revs. I would rather have the additives, a clean engine and better MPG.
The same fuel goes to damn near every station. It's the additives that make each station a bit different. Most of the additives are detergents and in Shell's case, Nitrogen. Nitrogen in the fuel will boost the mpgs a bit. It will also help keep thing clean, like other detergents.

For what it's worth, I'm a fuel Nazi and fill up at H-E-B, across the road from my house.
 

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Regular 87 is all you'll need. Unless you're tuned for a higher grade you won't see any real benefits to paying for premium gas....and I use Shell here in Northern California, I seem to get the best numbers from that specific gas.
 

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Regular 87 is all you'll need. Unless you're tuned for a higher grade you won't see any real benefits to paying for premium gas....and I use Shell here in Northern California, I seem to get the best numbers from that specific gas.
Ummm, Being Retired Navy, I use Navy Exchange 87 Gas. Whas that? I dunno, lowest bidder. Also been in areas where there was no "navy base" to go and used Shell, Cracker B or whatever. Never noticed a difference.

What I have been considering is whether the "may contain 10% ethenol" makes a difference.

There is a thread on this at;

http://www.crzforum.com/forum/honda-cr-z-mpg/2297-ethanol-free-gasoline.html

Scott
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Ummm, Being Retired Navy, I use Navy Exchange 87 Gas. Whas that? I dunno, lowest bidder. Also been in areas where there was no "navy base" to go and used Shell, Cracker B or whatever. Never noticed a difference.

What I have been considering is whether the "may contain 10% ethenol" makes a difference.

There is a thread on this at;

http://www.crzforum.com/forum/honda-cr-z-mpg/2297-ethanol-free-gasoline.html

Scott
What coast did you serve on. I am retired Navy too.
 

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Ummm, Being Retired Navy, I use Navy Exchange 87 Gas. Whas that? I dunno, lowest bidder. Also been in areas where there was no "navy base" to go and used Shell, Cracker B or whatever. Never noticed a difference.

What I have been considering is whether the "may contain 10% ethenol" makes a difference.

There is a thread on this at;

http://www.crzforum.com/forum/honda-cr-z-mpg/2297-ethanol-free-gasoline.html

Scott
Yes, the Ethenol makes a difference. It essentially waters down the gas with something that'll still burn. It drops your MPGs and makes more money for the gas company. :rolleyes:
 

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I know from personal expereince that gas from Arco, for example, gives you less milage. When I got my first(and also current) new car, the milage was pretty close to the EPA rating, however after the first tank when I started to use Arco, as they are cheaper, I noticed a drop in my MPG. I did the math and found my milage dropped by an average of %10.

Went to the service department and asked about it, and as soon as I mentioned Arco, they said thats probabily why. So I switched to using Shell and my milage went back up to normal. Also have a friend who has the same expereince with gas from Arco causing a drop in his MPG.

And for the hell of it we did the math and found out that even though Arco is cheaper, you wind up paying more when you factor in the %10 average drop in milage, as you have to refuel more often.
 

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Yes, the Ethenol makes a difference. It essentially waters down the gas with something that'll still burn. It drops your MPGs and makes more money for the gas company. :rolleyes:
Actually, it is the federal government so fuel "burns cleaner". Remember when E85 was all the rage about three years ago until it forced food prices to spike, was found not as efficient as gasoline and cost per gallon was more to manufacture?

In all reality, it doesn't matter what alternative fuel is found it is going to be costly commodity because of demand especially if we only use one type of fuel like we do now.
 
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