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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
...I'm guessing you are a teacher or Parent of young kids lol... omg, its like an encyclopedia response! Thank you!!!!! Its exactly the help i needed to help me sort out as I've been reading all these different sites and posting and trying to figure it out and this cleared it up in my brain! I appreciate that response so much!!!!!! Im hoping now i can trouble shoot this with a better level of confidence and yes, as i read more, had I just bought the whole unit, it would have been an expensive route that most like not solved my issue!!!! Again... a million thanks!!!
 

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please ask the shop to send a picture of what "pigtail" they are saying needs replaced. I may have a spare pigtail I can send out that you could splice in to repair your wiring.

the "pigtail" the shop is referring to is the wiring from the ballast to the igniter.

Worth a thousand words as they say.
 

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I am not any of these things, but was an English Major, and I do technical support and writing for a living. I like puzzles and helping people understand things. My biggest hope is your issue is resolved safely and quickly and with as little cost as possible.

Some mechanics who have been doing that kind of work for a long time remember simpler methods for repair. I personally have replaced lighting sockets in cars with pigtails using solder heat shrink and sometimes excellent electrical tape (https://www.3m.com/3M/en_US/p/d/b00...MIgZrJ9eqw-QIV9ciUCR2jxQPIEAAYASAAEgK-XvD_BwE for example). That is great, but in this case the igniter is the socket and can't be replaced with a simple socket with wires attached. Usually wires like that between the ballast and the igniter nothing ever happens to them, it is usually the electrical components themselves that fail, either the igniter or the ballast. I am surprised that those 2 parts from Honda are so much, but theoretically they should last the life of the car unless you have an accident.

Good luck, and please let us know what the final repair was and what part(s) were needed

...I'm guessing you are a teacher or Parent of young kids lol... omg, its like an encyclopedia response! Thank you!!!!! Its exactly the help i needed to help me sort out as I've been reading all these different sites and posting and trying to figure it out and this cleared it up in my brain! I appreciate that response so much!!!!!! Im hoping now i can trouble shoot this with a better level of confidence and yes, as i read more, had I just bought the whole unit, it would have been an expensive route that most like not solved my issue!!!! Again... a million thanks!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
please ask the shop to send a picture of what "pigtail" they are saying needs replaced. I may have a spare pigtail I can send out that you could splice in to repair your wiring.

the "pigtail" the shop is referring to is the wiring from the ballast to the igniter.

Worth a thousand words as they say.
Wow! Ok , will swing by tomorrow and have him point it out and will snap a picture!!!!!
I am not any of these things, but was an English Major, and I do technical support and writing for a living. I like puzzles and helping people understand things. My biggest hope is your issue is resolved safely and quickly and with as little cost as possible.

Some mechanics who have been doing that kind of work for a long time remember simpler methods for repair. I personally have replaced lighting sockets in cars with pigtails using solder heat shrink and sometimes excellent electrical tape (https://www.3m.com/3M/en_US/p/d/b00...MIgZrJ9eqw-QIV9ciUCR2jxQPIEAAYASAAEgK-XvD_BwE for example). That is great, but in this case the igniter is the socket and can't be replaced with a simple socket with wires attached. Usually wires like that between the ballast and the igniter nothing ever happens to them, it is usually the electrical components themselves that fail, either the igniter or the ballast. I am surprised that those 2 parts from Honda are so much, but theoretically they should last the life of the car unless you have an accident.

Good luck, and please let us know what the final repair was and what part(s) were needed
Ok, that makes sense and i wish i had checked this forum out years ago! While no major problems did have a few , including the door handle issue and that took me forever but i see some good posts here... live and learn... thank you again for taking the time to explain it out, it's really appreciated! As well as @96firephoenix!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·

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Just looking briefly and saw this post on amazon but no longer available , but I would only need the igniter part and not the ballast correct??

TBH I don't know hence my suggestion of swapping from good side to bad to narrow it down to one or the other.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
TBH I don't know hence my suggestion of swapping from good side to bad to narrow it down to one or the other.
Thanks but that may be too much for my diy... but i did find an igniter only with part number 33129SZTG01 and its at factoryzenon.com so im hoping i can just replace that and see if it solves...
 

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So from all the info you gents provided so far it looks like the igniter went bad!??! And i saw in previous post from @96firephoenix that it isn't too difficult to chage!!!! So yay!!!! Im hoping that this is it!!!!!!!!!!
yes, that's the igniter. it definitely needs replaced, and you can DIY pretty easily.

I would advise not to use the headlights until you've got a new igniter on there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
yes, that's the igniter. it definitely needs replaced, and you can DIY pretty easily.

I would advise not to use the headlights until you've got a new igniter on there.
Best news so far! I actually found a YT showing a guy that bought new lights and had to put old parts to new and he just happened show how to take out the igniter without meaning too lol.... so yes it does look straight forward enough... and yep driving only daylight till part arrives!!!! Thanks all!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Hello, just wanted to thank you both again for such a great help! I ordered a ballast/igniter combo from ebay for less than $100 and i was able to remove the igniter and replaced with new one... BUT! Bulb was bad, so bought a new pair and kept old working one as backup... i got so good at changing bulbs in a matter of mins lol! Good feeling to fix, but thanks again to @96firephoenix and @Spdbump !!!! You helped me understand what was needed!!!! so instead of $700, it was less than 150 total.... happy dance!!!!!
 

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Hello, just wanted to thank you both again for such a great help! I ordered a ballast/igniter combo from ebay for less than $100 and i was able to remove the igniter and replaced with new one... BUT! Bulb was bad, so bought a new pair and kept old working one as backup... i got so good at changing bulbs in a matter of mins lol! Good feeling to fix, but thanks again to @96firephoenix and @Spdbump !!!! You helped me understand what was needed!!!! so instead of $700, it was less than 150 total.... happy dance!!!!!
really glad we were able to help!
 

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When all was said and done, was it just the bulb that needed replacement or one or the other parts? I am just glad it is fixed, and it was a lot less than what that first place was trying to talk you into!

If it was just the bulb the swapping from one side to the other would have narrowed it down at no immediate cost to you, but it was a learning opportunity for you, and you now have spare parts for the next time you have an issue. You are now our HID Trouble shooting expert!:cool:

Hello, just wanted to thank you both again for such a great help! I ordered a ballast/igniter combo from ebay for less than $100 and i was able to remove the igniter and replaced with new one... BUT! Bulb was bad, so bought a new pair and kept old working one as backup... i got so good at changing bulbs in a matter of mins lol! Good feeling to fix, but thanks again to @96firephoenix and @Spdbump !!!! You helped me understand what was needed!!!! so instead of $700, it was less than 150 total.... happy dance!!!!!
 

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Another sort of related issue for headlights and fun with a dealership about wrong information.
 

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I am not any of these things, but was an English Major, and I do technical support and writing for a living. I like puzzles and helping people understand things. My biggest hope is your issue is resolved safely and quickly and with as little cost as possible.

Some mechanics who have been doing that kind of work for a long time remember simpler methods for repair. I personally have replaced lighting sockets in cars with pigtails using solder heat shrink and sometimes excellent electrical tape (https://www.3m.com/3M/en_US/p/d/b00...MIgZrJ9eqw-QIV9ciUCR2jxQPIEAAYASAAEgK-XvD_BwE for example). That is great, but in this case the igniter is the socket and can't be replaced with a simple socket with wires attached. Usually wires like that between the ballast and the igniter nothing ever happens to them, it is usually the electrical components themselves that fail, either the igniter or the ballast. I am surprised that those 2 parts from Honda are so much, but theoretically they should last the life of the car unless you have an accident.

Good luck, and please let us know what the final repair was and what part(s) were needed
I'm not good at posting like Roxy is but I just wanted to let you guys know there is a better alternative to vinyl electrical tape and it is silicone rubber self adhering military spec tape you can find it on Amazon in red and black. I was in the military in the late 80s and this stuff seals out air and water is anti corrosive and after stretching and using a 50 percent overlap it cures in 24 hours to impossible to remove with out a razorblade. You can buy the real stuff for 50 bucks a roll but the stuff on Amazon works just as well. Also a 6 inch strip will stretch (once hand warmed) to about 2 feet long so very little goes a long way! Sorry to butt in to your message thread. Have a good day!
 

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I'm not good at posting like Roxy is but I just wanted to let you guys know there is a better alternative to vinyl electrical tape and it is silicone rubber self adhering military spec tape you can find it on Amazon in red and black. I was in the military in the late 80s and this stuff seals out air and water is anti corrosive and after stretching and using a 50 percent overlap it cures in 24 hours to impossible to remove with out a razorblade. You can buy the real stuff for 50 bucks a roll but the stuff on Amazon works just as well. Also a 6 inch strip will stretch (once hand warmed) to about 2 feet long so very little goes a long way! Sorry to butt in to your message thread. Have a good day!
Soldering and heat shrink is the gold standard or good crimps. That tape is pretty good in an automobile environment.
 

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Heat shrink I don't think seals the same way this does. I agree with you soldering is the best way to connect two or more wires permanently, however - afterwards cleaning with alcohol to remove residual flux and sealing the insulation against oxidation and water is better accomplished with the mil spec self sealing tape. If you think about if the wires bent, would the heat shrink keep out oxygen? If oxygen can get in so can water.
 

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Yes, and the electrical tape I mentioned seals very well. You should make sure it is well sealed and the 3M tape I mentioned is available anywhere, it is not the cheap generic vinyl tape and heat shrink tubing and heat shrink tape works very well. I have been connecting wires more than half my life using solder, heat shrinkable products and the tape I mentioned(look at the specifications I listed it works in any environment and is over kill for internal wiring on a car, I have never had an issue. Learned soldering in HS along with how to make printed circuit boards and repair things at a board level. It is a skill and an art. My ability to solder has saved me time and having to go back to fix something many tines, but that is way off-topic for this post. Heat shrink will keep out oxygen if used properly. Do you think cheap crimps work any better? Most of those need either tape or some other product over them, unless they are the silicone filled type. If soldered correctly there is no cleaning needed, the flux burns off. The heat shrink tubing if sized properly seals it better than tape. Many do not know how to tape a connection properly, there are techniques for that. Mil spec is great, but how do you know the tape I referred to does not have a military specification? All Mill spec means is it meets a specification. My father was a radio man in the army. In civilian life he did a lot of wiring repairs both low and high voltage and used the 3M 88 tape, he is why I use it today. It is good for any kind of connection indoors, outdoors, high or low voltage.

Mil-Spec is a standard, nothing more, nothing less. There are many Mil-Specs for all kinds of things. It is not just one thing, it is a standard or specification for a particular use.

Heat shrink I don't think seals the same way this does. I agree with you soldering is the best way to connect two or more wires permanently, however - afterwards cleaning with alcohol to remove residual flux and sealing the insulation against oxidation and water is better accomplished with the mil spec self sealing tape. If you think about if the wires bent, would the heat shrink keep out oxygen? If oxygen can get in so can water.
 

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Yes, and the electrical tape I mentioned seals very well. You should make sure it is well sealed and the 3M tape I mentioned is available anywhere, it is not the cheap generic vinyl tape and heat shrink tubing and heat shrink tape works very well. I have been connecting wires more than half my life using solder, heat shrinkable products and the tape I mentioned(look at the specifications I listed it works in any environment and is over kill for internal wiring on a car, I have never had an issue. Learned soldering in HS along with how to make printed circuit boards and repair things at a board level. It is a skill and an art. My ability to solder has saved me time and having to go back to fix something many tines, but that is way off-topic for this post. Heat shrink will keep out oxygen if used properly. Do you think cheap crimps work any better? Most of those need either tape or some other product over them, unless they are the silicone filled type. If soldered correctly there is no cleaning needed, the flux burns off. The heat shrink tubing if sized properly seals it better than tape. Many do not know how to tape a connection properly, there are techniques for that. Mil spec is great, but how do you know the tape I referred to does not have a military specification? All Mill spec means is it meets a specification. My father was a radio man in the army. In civilian life he did a lot of wiring repairs both low and high voltage and used the 3M 88 tape, he is why I use it today. It is good for any kind of connection indoors, outdoors, high or low voltage.

Mil-Spec is a standard, nothing more, nothing less. There are many Mil-Specs for all kinds of things. It is not just one thing, it is a standard.
I know and am not disparaging your skill at soldering. Crimps are short term fixes. Think on this - if you had to connect 3 wires and the wires bent would the connection fail? More than likely yes, especially if the bending was repeated. Would any wire not fail. Over time all wires would fail if fatigued through bending. What about wiring that follows a hinge say from a trunk to an led light in a spoiler. When you think about that all of our cars are doomed. Right? Now how long do we have our cars 10 years, 15? That's why when they rebuild a car after 50 years they have to repair the wiring. I was taught how to crimp connections in high school, I was taught to solder connections in college, I had instructors teach me how to make connections in the army that withstood extreme conditions of the field and warfare training and where we had to make more than 2 wires connect and we needed them to work even if vehicles drove over them. The silicon self adhering tape worked better than most, I'll repeat most vinyl tape out there. I haven't tried your tape yet and you probably haven't tried mine either. Mine is expensive and yours might be better money wise for your uses. But I have taken the tape off of soldered connections I wired up for speaker wires I did in 1989 and the wires were like they had been soldered yesterday and they were exposed to the elements outside since then. They were for speakers that rusted away outside, around a pool. They speakers were totally dead but the wires I repurposed for my 7.1 system upstairs. They still work beautiful.
If I had to rewire a trailer I wouldn't hesitate to to do it. I know you trust your tape as well. I'm not arguing with you. I just said the mil spec stuff I use is freaking awesome. I stand behind that opinion.
 

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I know and am not disparaging your skill at soldering. Crimps are short term fixes. Think on this - if you had to connect 3 wires and the wires bent would the connection fail? More than likely yes, especially if the bending was repeated. Would any wire not fail. Over time all wires would fail if fatigued through bending. What about wiring that follows a hinge say from a trunk to an led light in a spoiler. When you think about that all of our cars are doomed. Right? Now how long do we have our cars 10 years, 15? That's why when they rebuild a car after 50 years they have to repair the wiring. I was taught how to crimp connections in high school, I was taught to solder connections in college, I had instructors teach me how to make connections in the army that withstood extreme conditions of the field and warfare training and where we had to make more than 2 wires connect and we needed them to work even if vehicles drove over them. The silicon self adhering tape worked better than most, I'll repeat most vinyl tape out there. I haven't tried your tape yet and you probably haven't tried mine either. Mine is expensive and yours might be better money wise for your uses. But I have taken the tape off of soldered connections I wired up for speaker wires I did in 1989 and the wires were like they had been soldered yesterday and they were exposed to the elements outside since then. They were for speakers that rusted away outside, around a pool. They speakers were totally dead but the wires I repurposed for my 7.1 system upstairs. They still work beautiful.
If I had to rewire a trailer I wouldn't hesitate to to do it. I know you trust your tape as well. I'm not arguing with you. I just said the mil spec stuff I use is freaking awesome. I stand behind that opinion.
this is off topic for this thead. if wires are bending they are run improperly. properly run wires bend very little if at all.
 
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