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I own a 2000 Honda Insight with about 235K miles. I average 51 MPG (I'm a lead foot). It's a 5 spd and I have even autoxed it for 2 years.
 

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I own a 2000 Honda Insight with about 235K miles. I average 51 MPG (I'm a lead foot). It's a 5 spd and I have even autoxed it for 2 years.
I currently have the opportunity to buy a 1-owner 2000 Insight with only 42k miles. It needs a new Hybrid Battery pack, presumably due to lack of use (4200mi/yr). Have you ever had to replace your battery pack?

I would have about $5.5k-$6k in it when all said and done. Worth it?
 

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I had an '07 Prius. Very reliable and comfortable. After almost two years and ~28,000 miles, I sold it back to the dealer for almost what I paid for it. Gas was spiking at the time and demand for the Prius was high.
 

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My best friend, who lives in the San Fernando Valley, has a friend that is the original owner of a 2000 Insight, who, as of two months ago, racked up 80 some thousand miles. Keeping meticulous records, and not letting anybody else drive his Insight, He has averaged 67 mpg since new, and is still on the original battery pack. I drove one when new, but thought it a litlle too soft and wallowy in ride. I bought an S2000 instead, and get 24 city/33 hwy vs the EPA rating of 20/26. And you may have read about two guys in N.J. that drove a Ford Fusion Hybrid non-stop over 1300 miles on one tank of gas, averaging 72 mpg in a certified weekend run.
 

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My best friend, who lives in the San Fernando Valley, has a friend that is the original owner of a 2000 Insight, who, as of two months ago, racked up 80 some thousand miles. Keeping meticulous records, and not letting anybody else drive his Insight, He has averaged 67 mpg since new, and is still on the original battery pack. I drove one when new, but thought it a litlle too soft and wallowy in ride. I bought an S2000 instead, and get 24 city/33 hwy vs the EPA rating of 20/26. And you may have read about two guys in N.J. that drove a Ford Fusion Hybrid non-stop over 1300 miles on one tank of gas, averaging 72 mpg in a certified weekend run.
nice choice on the S2k...

check this out that beats that NJ team... http://www.crzforum.com/forum/hybrid-talk/272-fusion-hybrid-goes-1-445-miles-single-tank.html
 

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2010 Insight EX. the 2002 CR-V was sold last Saturday and my wife hated the 2000 Insight (although I loved it). 49.0 MPG so far in the 2010. I used to think 32mpg in her Civic was amazing...
 

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I've never owned a hybrid, closest thing to it was my 07 Fit.
I avg about 34mpg and had hit 40mpg when i tried.
This is mostly highway, my commute to work is about 30miles each way.

My current car 135i avg about 24mpg, I now miss my Fit,
but this beast is fast.
 

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Missed this thread lol.

Own an 06 civic hybrid.
Best trip - 172 miles behind a tractor trailer @ 68 mpg
Best tank - 56 mpg over the summer mostly highway
Current tanks - 38-42 mpg

I used to pull out every trick I read but in the end the amount saved was equal to a weekly paycheck saved over just one year. I've now taken to enjoying driving which is still pretty decent in such a slow car. Once it gets going the civic can lane change pretty rapidly, minimal roll, and the instant assist at any speed is advantageous for over taking highway slow pokes.
 

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Missed this thread lol.

Own an 06 civic hybrid.
Best trip - 172 miles behind a tractor trailer @ 68 mpg
Best tank - 56 mpg over the summer mostly highway
Current tanks - 38-42 mpg

I used to pull out every trick I read but in the end the amount saved was equal to a weekly paycheck saved over just one year. I've now taken to enjoying driving which is still pretty decent in such a slow car. Once it gets going the civic can lane change pretty rapidly, minimal roll, and the instant assist at any speed is advantageous for over taking highway slow pokes.
This is an interesting post about the real world value of the IMA. You find that spectacular fuel economy (50 mpg+) is available to you with special effort or conditions. But when you drive your civic hybrid in a "normal" manner, you end up at 38 to 42 MPG or about 10 to 15% more than the 35 to 37 mpg I consistently get in "normal" driving from my 09 fit. So it continues to beg the question, is IMA hybrid technology worth the extra complexity/weight/cost in order to gain a real world 10 to 15% better fuel economy?

At that rate, the fuel savings is 277 gallons (< $1000) over 100,000 miles. So I would have to drive more than 400,000 miles to recover the additional $4000 that the typical hybrid upgrade costs over that of a non hybrid equivalent.

I was very excited about the possibility that a hybrid CRZ would possibly be 30 to 40% more efficient in real world driving than a comparable non hybrid powerplant, But it looks more like it is a 10 to 15% improvement, which is just not enough. Me thinks it time to scrap the IMA hybrid approach just as was done in F1 this year.
 

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IMA isn't as effective at its goal as the full hybrid setup but it allows the car the option of both CVT and MT. I'm not sure if a Prius could even offer a cost effective MT.

IMA will never be a large degree more efficient than ICE alone because it still requires the use of the ICE during acceleration - the big fuel consumer. Marginal gains are all that can be expected. IF Honda can build a lightweight and cost effective battery system then IMA could be useful. If it were only a $500 upgrade say to add an IMA system that would a very attractive sell.

IMA used for performance might make more sense... but.... then your very battery dependent. The huge unstated drawback of hybrids like the IMA setup is the battery cannot always give 100% operation. At times it runs low enough it forces the engine to work harder to charge it, and routinely it needs to calibrate itself so it forces a discharge. This forced regen is annoying because the electric motor won't operate for a good 3-5 miles of driving while the battery recharges up to full. This would be a killer problem for luxury or sports hybrids as owners would complain to no end about the car being so unreliably battery dependent.
 

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I don't get it. Why are there people on this site that rag on about 0 to 60 or MPG numbers as if those are the ONLY things important to them. Hey, if you're interested in a mileage-making hybrid, take a look at the Toyota Prius or Civic Hybrid at around the same price as a CR-Z. If you want 0-60 numbers at a similar price, go to a site featuring V6 or 4 cyl turbo gasoline powered cars. If you've got penty of money and want the ulimate green machine, check out the Tesla at $120 grand. But if you're just looking for a really good looking 21st century car that's fun to drive, you're probably on the right site.
 

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I still knock on this car because even if it is fun to drive and fairly fuel efficient then it also might be the same with just a 1.8L ICE alone.

As I mentioned in my last post there will be a couple hurdles this car will confront. The cars battery management is one of them. Can you imagine going to the track just to toss the car around for fun and when your up the car decides its time to deplete and calibrate the battery? Not so much fun right there.


Decided to expand this:

I would be open to this car but after owning a Honda hybrid for 83,000 miles so far I can say there are definite weaknesses that I doubt can be overcome. Doing a great deal of city driving currently has made me very conscious of the battery charge level. If it hits 50% car goes forced regeneration mode. Once a week it depletes itself fully to calibrate.

The very fact I have to watch my driving is becoming a turn off for me. I don't see myself moving to a point where I'll be driving mostly highway anytime soon. If it comes down to CR-Z vs regular gasser or TDI the latter have an edge because I can run the AC, turn the speakers up, keep the lights on, and all the while never worry about "omg is my battery gonna hit 50%?"....

If you have yet to experience it a hybrid trying to recharge its batteries while driving is a slow turd. Like European bus sized van stuck with a 1.2 petrol engine turd. Revving the CVT up to whine levels just to keep pace with cars to your side.
 

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I don't get it. Why are there people on this site that rag on about 0 to 60 or MPG numbers as if those are the ONLY things important to them. Hey, if you're interested in a mileage-making hybrid, take a look at the Toyota Prius or Civic Hybrid at around the same price as a CR-Z. If you want 0-60 numbers at a similar price, go to a site featuring V6 or 4 cyl turbo gasoline powered cars. If you've got penty of money and want the ulimate green machine, check out the Tesla at $120 grand. But if you're just looking for a really good looking 21st century car that's fun to drive, you're probably on the right site.
my new favorite member :hi5:
I still knock on this car because even if it is fun to drive and fairly fuel efficient then it also might be the same with just a 1.8L ICE alone.

As I mentioned in my last post there will be a couple hurdles this car will confront. The cars battery management is one of them. Can you imagine going to the track just to toss the car around for fun and when your up the car decides its time to deplete and calibrate the battery? Not so much fun right there.


Decided to expand this:

I would be open to this car but after owning a Honda hybrid for 83,000 miles so far I can say there are definite weaknesses that I doubt can be overcome. Doing a great deal of city driving currently has made me very conscious of the battery charge level. If it hits 50% car goes forced regeneration mode. Once a week it depletes itself fully to calibrate.

The very fact I have to watch my driving is becoming a turn off for me. I don't see myself moving to a point where I'll be driving mostly highway anytime soon. If it comes down to CR-Z vs regular gasser or TDI the latter have an edge because I can run the AC, turn the speakers up, keep the lights on, and all the while never worry about "omg is my battery gonna hit 50%?"....

If you have yet to experience it a hybrid trying to recharge its batteries while driving is a slow turd. Like European bus sized van stuck with a 1.2 petrol engine turd. Revving the CVT up to whine levels just to keep pace with cars to your side.
i've never owned a Hybrid vehicle... driven a few but not extensively... i agree while they can be slow they're also not fun... if the CR-Z is as fun to drive as i expect it to be, i'll be happy... all while maintaining AT-PZEV rating...

has anyone stopped to think that maybe in "Sport" mode the "forced regen" is deactivated?? i mean if that is the way this vehicle is programmed what will anyone have to say about not having the electric motor whenever you want at your disposal...

also more food for thought when comparing the CR-Z to other current Hybrids... the gas engine alone has around 110hp... the HCH has 98hp or so and the new Prius has like 70 something hp from a 1.8L engine... so i think the CR-Z even if it has the "forced regen" won't be the "turd" people are saying it might be...
 

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The 2000 to 2006 Honda Insight is an extremely light car (mostly aluminum and composite) that handles somewhat well stock. The biggest limiting factor are those darn skinny 165 stock tires.

I ran my 2000 Insight for 2 seasons of AutoX here in San Diego, CA with some success. I ran a set of "R" compound tires and had a set of Koni adjustable shocks and struts custom made to fit the stock mounting locations. The Gen 1 Insight is so light weight and nimble with the simple changes I made, it did real well.

There was nothing more satisfying than going out and beating a bunch of kids in their fart canned Civics every month. They couldn't understand how a Hybrid could beat them. An AutoX course can be very good for a light weight, under powered car (depending on which class you run and the competition). Just look at the original Miatas (MX5). 1990 Miata 116 hp, 100lbs torque, curb weight 2300 lbs (1990 specs). I expect the CRZ to be the same type of car. The CR-Z is a sports car in the true sense of the word, the CR-Z is not a muscle car.

By no means would I have run the Insight at a track event as the battery would have been fully drained after 1 lap. As it was I would have to come back to grid after my 1 lap autox run and force charge the battery by revving the engine to 3500 rpm.
 

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i've never owned a Hybrid vehicle... driven a few but not extensively... i agree while they can be slow they're also not fun... if the CR-Z is as fun to drive as i expect it to be, i'll be happy... all while maintaining AT-PZEV rating...

has anyone stopped to think that maybe in "Sport" mode the "forced regen" is deactivated?? i mean if that is the way this vehicle is programmed what will anyone have to say about not having the electric motor whenever you want at your disposal...

also more food for thought when comparing the CR-Z to other current Hybrids... the gas engine alone has around 110hp... the HCH has 98hp or so and the new Prius has like 70 something hp from a 1.8L engine... so i think the CR-Z even if it has the "forced regen" won't be the "turd" people are saying it might be...
Oh it is quite the turd I can assure you :D

Then again the CR-Z does weight in quite a significant less pork than my civic. My car has to strain in the RPM range to move forward if the electric motor doesn't provide any assist. With the CR-Z we shall have to wait and see.

As for "sport" mode I could be proven wrong but I'm going to place a degree of doubt on the idea forced regeneration will be disabled by drivers choice. The original Insight bore the burden of a few bad apples ruining it for everyone. Owners discovered they could over-ride the computer controlled battery functions on the MT models. This led to lower battery life, replacements, and a hurt model reliability rating. Honda reacted with no MT for the civic/Insight-II.

For the CR-Z I have confidence Honda will keep the IMA module brains in control of the battery allowing the driver limited control. Whatever "control" sport mode will allow will likely be determined by the car. Optimizing battery life will be the first priority. If that means a calibration of the battery when you don't want it.... :unsure:

Don't get me wrong. This car is going to be the most fun in an entry level hybrid yet to grace our shores. I'm sure of that much! :p
 
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