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...okay, so I am a lazy person, and haven't ever really done a DIY before. I'm going to apologize right away, as this is going to be more pointers than a full on DIY. My biggest concern trying this out the first time was finding the correct plugs to remove, so I figure that would be my key contribution here.

(cue in: "I take no responsibility for any damages you, your car, or anyone near you incurs from using this information. Do so at your own risk and skill level)

Onwards!

You will need:
Jack
Jack stands
3/8" socket wrench
3/8" extension
17 mm socket (... I think)
Honda MTF Fluid (2 quarts)
oil pan
Drain plug and fill plug washers
fluid pump

MAJOR STEP 1
loosen your driver's side tire. Put a chock on a rear wheel, jack up the car, put it on stands. Remove the tire.

You should now see a removable plastic panel. Use a flathead screwdriver to remove the 2 visible plastic inserts, then the 5(?) that are on the underside. This makes the transmission visible, as so:


MAJOR STEP 2
Do you see the bolt/plug that is square? Where the socket wrench extension goes? The lowest part of the transmission? That is the drain plug. DO NOT remove just yet.




The bolt with the 17 mm head is the fill plug - to the right and above the cv axle. Try removing this one first.
Reason: In case you cannot remove the fill plug (stripped, rusted, etc.), you will find this out before you drain all your fluid out, and can still drive the car to a professional to remove it/do the service for you.

Once the fill plug is loosened/removed, THEN you can move on to the drain plug. Put the oil catch pan underneath, and remove the drain plug. Once the oil is drained fully, use your new crush washer, and tighten your drain plug (I believe 33 ft/lbs, but do your research).

MAJOR STEP 3:
Open one of your MTF bottles, and feed your fluid pump through the fill hole, as shown:


Make sure that your pump is in the correct direction, pumping from the bottle TO the transmission. If not sure, cover one hose end with your hand to see if you get push pressure, or suction.



The manual states 1.4 quarts for a flush, 1.6 for a rebuild. Just pump a whole bottle, then when you get to about halfway of the second bottle, slow down. Keep pumping slowly until some oil starts coming out of the fill hole. Look carefully - Honda MTF is not very viscous. Remove the hose.

MAJOR STEP 4
Use a new washer, tighten the fill plug (again, I think 33 ft lbs, but look for it yourself. I'm going off s2000 torque specs). Reverse steps for assembly and bringing car down from raised status.

MAJOR STEP 5
Always look over your work. Check for any loose tools, extra bolts, washers, etc. There shouldn't be any. Lastly, turn your car on. Put it in gear. Drive it a bit. Make sure there is no leaking of fluids underneath. If there is, turn off, jack up, reinspect.

Hopefully this was a happy inbetween of being useful for the first timer, and providing quick information for those who just need the relevant. Happy wrenching.


Edit: According to litz:
Fluid Capacity:
1.5 US qt. at fluid change
1.7 US qt. at overhaul

Filler plug torque 32 lb-ft
Drain plug torque 29 lb-ft

Thanks, man!
 

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....
MAJOR STEP 2
Do you see the bolt/plug that is square? Where the socket wrench extension goes? The lowest part of the transmission? That is the drain plug. DO NOT remove just yet.
.....
The bolt with the 17 mm head is the fill plug - to the right and above the cv axle. Try removing this one first.
Reason: In case you cannot remove the fill plug (stripped, rusted, etc.), you will find this out before you drain all your fluid out, and can still drive the car to a professional to remove it/do the service for you.
One of the most intelligent posts I've seen on any automotive forum. Such a simple detail, and so often not considered. :thumbsup:
 

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Nice write up. For those that don't have a pump or want to purchase one you can also use a standard funnel and spare hose to reach down to the fill hole from the top of the engine bay.
 

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cu do's to you for a well done job and the follow up pics. And for using Honda MTO, I did mine at 100k, and noticed my trans shifting nice and smooth again. I cheated in raising the car up though..I have a lift these days.
 

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Well damn--I removed my fill and drain plugs, but realized I didn't have a new fill plug crush washer on hand--UGH! So, I'll have to pick one up tomorrow--here are the part numbers, just for the record:

94109-20000 Washer, Drain Plug (20mm) [fluid fill]

94109-14000 Washer, Drain Plug (14mm) [same size as engine fluid drain plug crush washer]

(I use the Fumoto F-106N Engine Oil Drain Valve for the engine's oil drain, so I haven't had to mess with replacing that washer, so I completely forgot the need for the 20mm washer when changing the transmission fluid.)
 

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I didn't take off the left/front wheel, but just removed the left/front under-panel to get to the drain and fill bolts. I did the fill by routing a funnel from the top side, but I had to get an extra length of hose to extend it to a 24" length, and snaked it down to the fill hole. It didn't look like my crush washer was "crushed" at all, so it probably wasn't necessary to get a new one (but I did, just the same.) A couple of pics below, to show the routing of the funnel and the difference in oil after 34,000 miles--I don't know when it actually needs to be changed, but since I bought the 6-Speed used, I was interested to see the quality of the old oil.
 

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Well, you "should", but bear in mind that you're surrounded by cars that have never had the trans oil changed, nor the diff fluid looked at. Along with countless other neglects, and they're still making 200K.
 

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hmm... maybe time to get on that... I just crested 94,000 and it hasn't been done before, to my knowledge.
I did mine way early, but I'm glad I did it, just to see what the "old" fluid looked like. You can see in the pic above, that it just looks a bit darker than the new fluid, but I suppose it wouldn't hurt to go to 100,000 miles before a change--I was just paranoid because it was bought used, and you never really know what the other owner put it through, but so far, it looks like he kept it in every-bit as good of shape as I would, so I'm quite pleased with that.

Well, you "should", but bear in mind that you're surrounded by cars that have never had the trans oil changed, nor the diff fluid looked at. Along with countless other neglects, and they're still making 200K.
For the minimal cost of replacing fluids, I figure it's a good idea to make sure ALL of them are replaced every 100,000 miles, but I'm a little fanatical about things like that.:wink2:
 

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Is the Fumoto F-106N Engine Oil Drain Valve a magnetic plug or some type of improvement over stock aside from a permanent washer?
It is a valve you will never have to remove it! No chance of stripping the oil pan threads and almost goof proof! The Speed Bump will get one of these if I ever figure out a way to do oil changes living in an apartment.
 

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For the minimal cost of replacing fluids, I figure it's a good idea to make sure ALL of them are replaced every 100,000 miles, but I'm a little fanatical about things like that.:wink2:
No, you're merely a competent and caring motorist. The other eight of us know just what you mean.
 

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It is a valve you will never have to remove it! No chance of stripping the oil pan threads and almost goof proof! The Speed Bump will get one of these if I ever figure out a way to do oil changes living in an apartment.
Well, if you'd get over parking it inside your apartment, it'd make things easier.
 
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