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Yes all the IMA data is available as well as the other systems. I also now have one of the prototype OBDC&C units from @PeterPerkins for IMA monitoring and control but those aren't generally available yet.
 

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I also now have one of the prototype OBDIIC&C units from @PeterPerkins for IMA monitoring and control, but those aren't generally available yet.
The OBDIIC&C is available, but is hand made by me and therefore expensive $350.
It's designed for dash mounted real time constant monitoring, BMS control, IMA control etc etc, not occasional use. ;)

The clone $100 HDS is the way to go if you just want to have a look at all the systems occasionally.
 

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There you go from the man himself.
The HDS clone is definitely the better value and it does give you access to everything not just the IMA. However it's definitely for occasional/as needed use only as it's too much stuff to leave connected all the time (not even including the laptop). The C&C is just one small unit that can be left in place without being in the way.
Overall, the more diagnostic tools you have, the better.
 

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Whew!! I just went down the rabbit hole looking at all of those Chinese Diagnostic Code Reader Thingies. How in the world would you know what you are getting. Some say to choose one make vehicle, while others it would seem let you use them on any vehicle. I've got a basic code reader and it works on ODBII vehicles. I have always wanted something a little more in depth but...........
 

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Well the HDS is a Honda-specific system that won't work on anything else. The reason you want one over a generic OBDII reader is that the HDS will communicate with all the systems on the car- engine, body, ABS, TPMS, IMA, SRS etc. The generic reader will do engine only. While it's good to have one of those for everyday code reading and quickie engine diagnosis, for more advanced vehicle-specifc stuff you need to be able to see all the manufacturer-specific items. This is especially true on the CRZ
 

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It's worth noting that generic ten a penny OBDII code readers can also only access a small fraction of the ECM (Engine stuff)
You need an HDS or expensive equivalent to see more than the mandated legal OBDII standard minimum.

An HDS is a must for any Honda enthusiast. I have two. (y)

Here are a couple of HDS printouts of the lists of things you can see for the PGMFI ECM (Engine) and MCM (IMA)
 

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Well the HDS is a Honda-specific system that won't work on anything else. The reason you want one over a generic OBDII reader is that the HDS will communicate with all the systems on the car- engine, body, ABS, TPMS, IMA, SRS etc. The generic reader will do engine only. While it's good to have one of those for everyday code reading and quickie engine diagnosis, for more advanced vehicle-specifc stuff you need to be able to see all the manufacturer-specific items. This is especially true on the CRZ
It's worth noting that generic ten a penny OBDII code readers can also only access a small fraction of the ECM (Engine stuff)
You need an HDS or expensive equivalent to see more than the mandated legal OBDII standard minimum.

An HDS is a must for any Honda enthusiast.
Gotcha.

I had in my mind that a new scan tool would be good for all the vehicles for my family. My son has a 2000 Camaro, 2017 Toyota Highlander, 2012 Honda Civic, and a 2004 Jeep Rubicon. I have a 2017 Infiniti Q50, 2014 Chevy Silverado, 1970 Corvette with a 2002 SS Camaro engine, and my 2011 CRZ. I was hoping one of those scanners would be able to look at all of those vehicles. The generic scanner I have can read the codes in all of those vehicles.
 

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The above is true for all vehicles, there are generic OBD codes and parameters as well as manufacturer-specific ones. For most common diagnostics the generic is sufficient, but for more advanced stuff you need either the actual mfr. tool or an aftermarket one that can read their data.
For Honda, a "real" HDS is $thousands and requires a connection to their internal network, but thanks to the Chinese we have the $100 cloned/hacked version that works on its own. There are similar devices for other makes.
As I've already mentioned I use Torque Pro for a generic device and I highly recommend it. Since it works with my phone I always have it with me, so if a code pops up on whichever vehicle I'm driving I grab the Bluetooth adapter from the toolbag and plug it in to read the code.
Torque also displays live data and readiness status which is very useful in states like NY that have OBD inspection where non-ready monitors are a failure. It also allows you to add custom PIDs to read non-standard data items, has virtual gauges and other useful features. At $5 US it's quite a good deal, you just have to add the ELM327 Bluetooth dongle and those can be had cheap.
 
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